La Grande Car Show

In July, some friends of mine made a second trip to La Grande, Oregon to participate in the Grande Ronde-A-View Car Show. This time one couple, Jim & Sylvia took their ’39 Ford Sedan and the other couple, Wes & Becki, took their ’40 Chevy Sedan. The Cruise is put on by the Timber Cruisers Car Club. (www.timbercruiserscarclub.com) As I mentioned, this was their second time to go to this cruise. This must speak to the fun this show offers, it’s around 200 miles from Beavercreek.

They stayed in the renovated, “The Landing Hotel” a mixture of rustic and modern decor in downtown La Grande. They all liked sitting on the second-floor veranda right above their cars displayed below on the main drag. Jim told me that there were a couple hundred cars with some from far reaching places, Lake Havasu, Arizona for instance, some from Canada, of course Oregon, Washington, Idaho and other places I can’t remember.

This is a three-day show, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Sponsored by local businesses and it’s held right on the main drag through town and at Riverside Park. In addition, there is a Poker Run and a Country side cruise up into the local mountains. The local businesses/sponsors include Les Schwab Tires, Baxter Auto Parts, Market Place, M. J. Goss Motors Co. and La Grande Gold & Silver.

Next years show is scheduled for July 19th thru the 21st. Maybe it should be on your list.

Sadly, this was Wes Warner’s last car show. He passed away after a stroke on August 4th. He will be missed.

Portland Vintage Racing Festival 2018

It has been quite a few years since I have been to the historic races at PIR. So this year my friend Terry and I decided to go. We got there early in time to get a great parking spot, in the shade because it was going to get hot.

I, myself, like to tour through the pits or paddock before the cars get on the track. The showcases of the day were vintage Formula 1 and Trans Am cars. Of the Formula 1 cars there were Brabham, Tyrrell, Shadow, Lotus, McLaren and several others. Also Trans Am cars such as Mustangs, Camaros, and Corvettes. These were more modern bodied cars not like the old ‘67, ‘68, ‘69 and ‘70 Mustangs and Camaros that I remember of the original Trans Am cars.
Also racing were your typical selection of ‘60s and ‘70s sports cars. In different race groups there were Alfa Romeo, Porsche, BMW, Lotus, Jaguar, Volvo, Corvette, Camaro, Mustang, and a ‘65 VW Bug. Also formula cars such as Titan, Winkelmann, March, Swift, Lola and a gaggle of others were making great music on the track.

I always go for the underdogs so it was great to see a ‘65 Bug on the track mixing it up with the sporty type car. By the way, if you did not know I am a proud owner of a 1965 VW Bug named Vincent Wendall.

Also mixing it up with the V8 cars was a 1964 Studebaker Daytona. It was great to see it run with the Corvettes, Mustangs, a Porsche and a Ford Falcon.

Actually, my most favorite car there was a 1970 McLaren Can Am car. Beautiful red, big block, staggered velocity stacks, big tires and the deepest rumble sound.

The modern Trans Ams were smooth and fast until Greg Pickett looped his Mustang in turn 9. Now I know your going to say turn 9? I am old school in the old configuration of pir and it was turn 9 then. Now it’s turn 12. You know, the big sweeping right hand turn coming on to the front straight.

Geoff Brabham was the grand marshal of the festival driving a ‘72 Titan FF MK6B. I thought the most unique named car is the “Pooper” a 1953 Porsche powered Cooper. This was like one that Roger Penske drove back in the day. The weather was clear, the sun was hot and the racing was great. A great day overall even if it did take me three and a half hours to get home when it should have taken an hour and a quarter. Portland traffic!

The Bob Collison Story

Many of our readers enjoyed stories published here and written by BC Collie Dog aka. Bob Collison, I know I enjoyed and appreciated his work. Bob is an amazing man and has devoted his life to helping others without any expectations of reciprocal kindness or compensation. As some of you may know, Bob’s health has been giving him trouble for some time and he has not been able to attend the many car functions he loves to be a part of. To pay medical expenses he sold his beloved Model T Ford that he had owned since 1957.

At this writing he is still battling some of these same health issues and is unable to be involved with R & R NW. Some time back I asked him to write a short autobiography that I could publish here just to let you all know about Bob and what a great man he really is. Below, in his own words, is a brief history of this wonderful guy. Hang in there Bob.

A biography on Robert Max Collison, aka Bobby, Maxwell, Robin Old Boy, and Colliedog BC.

Born into this world in the year 1941, just before the United States entered into the 2nd World War. It was a sad time in most families as many fathers, older brothers, uncles, older cousins, and grandfathers prepared to go off to foreign countries to fight a war we didn’t want.
Unlike his two older brother who were healthy and of average size for their age, Bobby came into the world with a serious breathing ailment, described as a bad case of childhood asthma. There was no usable medication available back in 1941 for newborns with this ailment. In addition to asthma, he also had developed, with his breathing problems, a ruptured upper stomach area. Due to these health problems he weighed just 5lb 5oz. at birth.

He was born in a hospital in Mt. Vernon, Washington which is located near the Coast of the Pacific Ocean. Not a healthy place for a child with asthma. It was decided by the family that it would be best if he could be moved to the Western part of the State to a drier climate. Thus, for the first couple of years of his young life, he moved in with his mother’s family. Grandpa and Grandma Hanon’s home in the little hamlet of Toppenish, Washington. He then was moved to the Spokane area where his parents relocated to in 1943. His Grandparents, the Hanson’s moved to the Portland area to help build ships for the U.S. Navy. Bobby’s father was assigned to the U.S. Naval Supply Depot in Spokane as a security police officer for most of the war. In April of 1943, the Collison family welcomed a new baby sister to their home and Bobby finally had someone his size to play with. At two years and four months old he only weighed about 30lbs. At Five his little sister out-weighed him and was several inches taller. She was riding a bike and Bobby was still having trouble on a stand-up scooter.

There was no pre-school or kindergarten back then and Bob started school at 5 years old. He was born left handed but the teachers back then, unless you already had readable penmanship, you were only taught using you right hand. This he never was comfortable with his hand writing abilities. His brain would only let him hit a baseball left handed, but his teachers would only let him write right handed. This at his teacher’s insistence, he was kept after class practicing is right-handed penmanship instead of being out on the playing field hitting left handed home runs??? Robert had, at times in his young life, a history of being a bit bull-headed, his Grandma would say he was strong minded.

In the summer of his ninth year, he loved to go swimming at the Dishman swimming pool. Unfortunately for about fourteen of us kids out of several thousand, that summer that used this outdoor heated and filtered swimming pool, it became an introduction to a horrible experience. The filtration system at the pool indicated that it was working properly, but it failed and no one caught it for several weeks and the Polio Virus had come alive in that pool. Within thirty days fourteen of us had symptoms of Polio growing in our bodies. By the middle of August, I was admitted into the Deaconess Hospital Polio ward and kept there in an isolation room for several weeks. I was then sent over to the St. Lukes Crippled Childrens Hospital. I was infected with a muted strain of the virus that crippled me and took away my ability to speak and all I did for months was lay crippled in bed. This was three years before they came up with the Salk Vaccine to fight the dreaded virus. We had specialist coming to Spokane from around the world giving us all kinds of new break through research, untested shots of treatments trying to find a cure. After every injection there would be a three to five day waiting period to give the new medicine a chance to work, if it was going to. Then came the worst of the treatment, as they would tap our spines, removing spinal fluid, so they could see if the new meds were working. It’s been sixty-five years and I can still feel them sticking, what felt like a dull phillips screw driver into my spine and telling me if I moved a muscle, I would never walk again. This procedure, treatment, was repeated on my body six times during my stay in the hospital in the next 18 months. I was just nine when all this started and finally they came up with a treatment that stabilized me and I was able to recover. Thanks to the excellent physical therapy treatment I received, I was able to rebuild my body’s strength and leg muscles up so I could walk again and finally I got my speaking voice back. As it turned out, I was one very lucky young man. The only down side to my sickness was people that had the Polio Virus have a 75% greater chance of developing Kidney Stones and I have been stricken with them 19 times in my 75 year.

On a more positive side, after 18 months in and out of the hospital with all the excellent care I received, my parents received a final bill from the hospital in the amount of $284,000 that was due, and all but $2,000 of that final bill was donated and paid by the Masonic Order, which we found out later, my uncle, Grandpa Hanson’s brother, was a volunteer active Mason in Montana and he entered our name for consideration. They donated the $282,000 on my behalf.

I was in excellent condition after leaving the hospital and in the next two years, when I entered Junior High School, I turned out for track and field. Since I was in such excellent shape I went undefeated in the 100-yard dash right up and through high school. I earned a slot to compete in the Olympic Trails in 1959 at Washington State College, (now Washington State University) for my age group covering Eastern Washington. I took a fifth-place ribbon covering the whole Pacific Northwest Region, including, Washington, Idaho, Montana and Eastern Oregon, at the U. S. Track and Field trials for the 1960 Olympic Team. I didn’t quite make the team but from where I had come in my life, from 1949 to 1959, I covered a lot of experiences.

In response when I was 16 years old, I joined the Demolay. The Masonic organizations program for young people. The Mason’s are the financial support foundation to the Shriners Childrens Hospitals, nationwide. In recap, I have been paying back as well as paying forward, that generous donation made to me and my family for the 59 years. I have served on the Doernbecher Board for the past twenty six years and our programs have raised several million dollars for our local Doernbecher Childrens Hospital Cancer Research with the KDCCP affiliation with Kiwanis International. In addition, I had the opportunity to head up a Save Old Spectacles. (SOS) program covering the Pacific Northwest and Western Canada collecting used/reusable eye-glasses. After collecting over 500,000 thousand pairs, we helped start an Eye Clinic with Dr. Jim Wyrick in the Philippines.. Our program was chosen to receive, thru a bankruptcy disbursement, a complete eye clinic’s office, including all usable and needed equipmemt. The finished clinic, “I Care, We Care,” valued at over a million dollars was all donated and shipped to the Philippines over 20 years ago, helping thousands of people with eye care and eye glasses at no expense to them. That was truly a gift of sight to the less fortunate.

The millions we have raised for Doernbecher Children’s Hospital Cancer Research, OHSU, with the raffling of new Ford Mustangs and the generous donated gift of new and used cars from wonderful giving people over the past 26 years, has really added up. In addition, our association with the Multnomah Hot Rod Council and the Portland Roadster Show, The Salem Roadster Show and the Eugene Roadster Show over these past years with 100% of all net proceeds going directly to the Cancer Research Program with no charge from any of these wonderful Car Show Promoters. A Special Thanks goes out to all the hundreds of volunteers that have donated tens of thousands of hours to help make all of our charitable gift giving programs, 100% for the children of the world.

Our KDCCP program has been part of the big picture of charitable giving in the Portland, Oregon area of late. Thanks to the gift from Mr. Phil Knight, the founder and CEO of NIKE Corp, an unbelievable personal gift in the form of a pledge of 500 million dollars was dedicated to OHSU Doernbecher Childrens Hospital and the Knight Cancer Institute. The pledge gave the rest of the Foundation Fund Raising groups a chance to match his donation with in five years. We were please to announce the match was accomplished in two and one-half years. Thanks to the wonderful generosity of local people like Mrs. Gert Boyle’s, CEO of Columbia Sportswear, 100-million-dollar donation, we were able to match Mr. Knights gift. The OHSU, Knight Cancer Institute, Doernbecher Childrens Hospital Cancer Research Program, now have one billion dollars of charitable contributions in the bank and dedicated to future programs at OHSU.

Since 1969 I have had the honor and pleasure to have been involved with the Kiwanis International Service Clubs as the President of clubs in Montana, Oregon and Idaho. I have served as the President of the Pacific Northwest District of Kiwanis and served a chairman of four district wide programs. Plus, I have chaired the KDCCP Car Raffle Fundraising Program for the past fifteen years. I have also served on the board at Doernbecher. I have also had the honor to serve on the car raffle committee for over 26 years and helped raise well over 3.5 million dollars. In all the programs totaled. It’s called paying it back and forward, from the heart.

I am a member of the Multnomah Hot Rod Council and have donated my time and funds to the Portland Roadster Show for over 25 years.
In the past few years I have enjoyed developing my writing skills with several monthly articles in Roddin’ & Racin’ NorthWest, which featured Street Rod and Custom car stories and pictures from Bob Collison and under my penname Colliedog BC.
Robert Collison Autobiography continues:

In 1960 I enlisted in the United States Coast Guard. I spent eight years on active duty and in the reserve program during the Vietnam Conflict. While on active duty I was selected to be a part of the USCG Honor Guard Precision M-1 Marching Drill Team. We performed all over the West Coast, marching in Parades and Regattas from Seattle to Spokane, San Francisco, Oakland, Los Angeles, San Diego and of course the Portland Rose Festival. I served on the USCG Cutter Taney, USCG Buoy Tender, the Sweetbrier and the USCG, 95 ft. S&R Craft out of Juneau, Alaska. It was an honor to serve our country, helping others in their hour of need.

Most recently I have served the Veterans program assisting with the “MIAP’ Missing in America Project, locating deceased Veterans that have passed away and nobody has claimed their cremated remains. This project gives the opportunity for us to help loved ones find a lasting and final resting place for their veterans. The local Pharaohs Street Rodders, custom car club are a big financial supporter of this program and the Lines for Life Veterans Project donating thousands of dollars every year to these fine programs.

While serving on the Pacific Northwest District of Kiwanis managing board for over 16 years, I had the pleasure of helping raise funds and support the Northwest Medical Teams as they helped build a school and living quarters for children that were living on and out of the giant refuge dump site that serviced Mexico City. We raised several million dollars and the program is still going strong today. Thanks to our help and the Northwest Medical Teams fantastic efforts of Ron Post and his dedicated team of volunteers. Northwest Medical Teams has updated their program and are now, “Medical Teams International.”

Also, while on the district team we had the opportunity to help raise over seventy five million dollars world-wide to assist in eradicating the problem of “IDD.’ Iodine Deficiency Disorder, (the lack of iodine in one’s diet.) With our ongoing support and assistance to the UNICEF program, this terrible problem has been eradicated in 90% of the world.

We are now assisting the United Nations in the challenge of expectant mothers in the third world countries that are exposed to the Tetanus Bacterium. There is a high percentage chance of infecting their unborn children. One single Tetanus shot to the new mother can eradicate the problem. We have helped raise over one hundred million dollars, to date, world-wide for this ongoing program and it’s world-wide scope.

It’s been an honor and a living experience to have served on some fantastic world-wide fund raising programs over these past fifty nine years. The real treat has been to appreciate and understand that I was truly blessed back when I was just a kid and I have never forgotten the gifts of support that were extended to me and my family in our hour of need. In addition, I owe all of the members of my family and my extended family a gift of appreciation to all of those special times when I was out fund raising for a worldly cause and was not able to attend all of your special birthday gatherings and the missed family outings. Thanks every one of you for helping me help kids in far away lands, have a little better time in their lives, because we reached out and helped them in their hour of need.

6 Second Hero

Oh, he had walked the walk. A blue collar pencil pusher by day. He knew the in and outs of the corporate shell. Nailed the daily punch card and had a perfect record. He would speak when asked and worked hard to achieve goals set by those in charge. A dedicated company man. A company man dedicates his time and effort to help keep the status quo by doing his part Never causing ripples to upset the boat. Just remain a steady hard edged cog in all that keeps the company moving forward. Monday through Friday. Even at his clean desk he did not have any distractions, unlike his co-workers. No radio or personal desk calendars or family pictures. The higher ups liked that, in their mind it kept him focused. Friday would arrive and the seeds of an approaching weekend would sprout throughout the office. BBQ’s,  soccer /basket ball/football/hockey games.  A gathering of co-workers at Benigan’s and knock a few back to start the weekend. He always turned their offers down, he had other plans. As his co-workers left in their shiny new cars and SUVs, He gladly climbed behind the wheel of his trusty 1989 Dodge truck and headed west, his heart and mind focused on his other office which waited.

Friday nights are all about prep. Tear down and rebuild.  Planning, strategy. Dirty Johnny watches the weather and working with Woody, determines sparkplugs, fuel/air ratio, tire pressure. Knowing. The brothers discuss the barometer and weather for the next day.  Dirty and Woody come to a decision and reassemble the smallblock. Ol’ Skinny, well, wise as he is, just watches. Knowing. And as the moon rises and the digger is prepped and ready for Saturday, revelry in the pits is not too uncommon, and the first of many of Golden’s finest is emptied.

The morning sun blasts the pits with warmth.  The temperature creeps as the asphalt gets softer. Skinny is resting on a stack of racing slicks. Late night combined with an early morning. Through the fog of a night’s good time the team works. A mild throb in the skull, but the boys have work as one. A unified  machine of a hidden teamwork. Dirty Johnny casts a glance to the horizon.  Then looks at his watch and studies the track thermometer. “Hmm.” He knows that their time for their first run is not for an hour, but if the conditions are just right.

The pits are strong with the smell of racing fuel. Alcohol. Nitro. Skinny suits up and Woody tends to the tow straps. Dirty climbs into the Dodge and eases the pick up forward. The soft breeze calms and the weather balances. Still. No wind. Dirty Johnny raises an eyebrow.

The launching of a dragster is all about a check list. Woody had lived it since he was only as tall as a racing slick. Everyone tending to the launch has a job to do and most important is the communication with the driver. Fire up, tow straps disengaged, chute straps pulled. Every detail ran through like clockwork and then it was all up to Skinny.
A quick burn out, heating the tires up. Not too much. Guided back into place and then he rolls forward slowly and the Christmas tree lights up that he has pre-staged.

Now he is staged and it begins. Yellow. Yellow. Yellow.

As the yellow light fades he stabs the throttle. A weeks worth of sweat and prep comes down to a millisecond as his reaction time is .499.

Green flashes by and he feathers the throttle. No tire spin, and the small block screams.

And it’s done. He pulls the shoot and coasts..drag chute slowly pulling the dragster safely to a stop.
Numbers flash across the display board. 6.1  201.54.

The crowd howls. Skinny Jim pumps his fist and whoops.
Just another day in his office.

Written for my friend Skinny Jim O’Connell. Happy Birthday, man.

MECUM Auction comes to Portland again in 2018

The collector car hobby is alive and well all cross the America. The “Collector Car Auction” has become a regular on cable TV channels like NBC Sports, The Discovery Channel, Velocity and so on. These events are exciting and fun with lots of glitz and glamour, bright lights, shiny cars, auctioneers, calling out for bids in a cadence that’s hard for the average guy to duplicate and that cadence only adds to excitement and implants a sense of urgency.

Mecum came to Portland again in June 2018. They travel all across the continent producing their collector car auctions in, I think, 18 locations, it’s a traveling show and what a show it is. I heard these auctions described as the biggest and best car show you can attend, and everything is for sale!

Mark Young with the Northwest House of Hardtops @ 11834 SE Stark, in Portland, OR., 503-257-9050, brought much of his inventory to the auction and a lot found new homes. His inventory is usually just spectacular. Rare muscle cars, fantastic restorations, beautiful and well-kept Corvettes of all years. Each offering a treasure to any car guy or car gal.

Mecum offered more than 600 lots this year and nearly 300 sold for about a 50% sell through. Total sales reached 8.3 million. I found many cars that I would love to call mine but alas, my budget just can’t handle what my mind thinks I might need.

For access to complete auction results, or for a schedule of Mecum’s upcoming events, you can sign up for the free InfoNet service at www.Mecum.com. Check out some pictures of cars that were offered and put Mecum Portland on your calendar for next June.

If you’re selling, consign early. They will post your car on the site so people shopping can see your car. If you’re looking to buy, check their website for a look at what’s going to be available. Obviously, next years auction won’t be shown yet but don’t forget to check back often to stay up to speed on what’s coming.

Collector car auctions are a great place to locate the car of your dreams and you can buy it there and take it home.

National Collector Car Appreciation Day

As this goes to press, it is Friday the 13th, National Collector Car Appreciation Day. Congress has honored all Gearheads by making this our special holiday. We hope it was special for you.

The Wednesday night Beaches cruise-ins opened out at PIR June 6th. And what a Whopper it was, reportedly over 1800 cars in attendance. Unfortunately I have no coverage of this event as the pixel 2 work phone holding thatinfo, mysteriously disappeared Into Thin Air out there. #GearHeadsWorld is still on the lookout for it.

Tesla Makes The News Again:

Another Tesla Model S has gone up in flames. This one belongs to a movie star who had parked it on Santa Monica Boulevard. Some of you may have seen the viral video. in the meantime, Elon Musk has fired a load of his mid-level managers. Looks like he is trimming things down.

Next we have a self-driving Uber that has fatally killed a bicyclist. The driver was behind the wheel streaming “The Voice.” Charges have been brought.

Speaking of bicycles, did you hear the one about the Motorcycle Company who goes back to building bicycles just like they did a hundred years ago when they started? Yep, we are talking about Harley. It seems that the bubble has burst that consisted of the successful baby boomers who climbed aboard their Harleys in the wake of the tremendously successful Discovery show American Chopper which has also settled back down to earth.
Now Harley is looking at the millennial yuppies who don’t want motorcycles. They prefer Nifty bicycles so Harley will be supplying them. They won’t be cheap. You will have to drop around 4 Grand for one. So, now the word bike will have a whole new meaning for Harley.

We like to put in a good word for the RPM bill which continues to be successfully lobbied. Now we have a new wrinkle, it seems that EPA administrator Scott Pruitt, has resigned under pressure. Now we wait to see how all that shakes out.

Now, here is our high performance news of the week. And this, most definitely is a harbinger of things to come. The Pikes Peak competition has recently wrapped. There has been a world record run hosted by an electric car. This was the VW l. D. R electric car. It posted a 7. 57 at 148 mph, which is the fastest run for any kind of vehicle ever!
In conclusion we would like to make mention of The Rockin Around The Block cruise in which is coming right up in Gresham. This is the event put on by the Northwest Motorsports Association to benefit the Mount Hood Community College automotive department. Hot rods will take over the entire downtown for the entire day on Saturday August 11th.

’nuff said, Chuck Fasst.
GearHeadsWorld@blogspot.com

Another Man’s Treasure

What follows is part two of a story I began in the February 2018 issue of Roddin’ & Racin’. It was entitled: “One Man’s Junk…” and told the story of a unique wrecking yard in Springfield, Oregon that is brimming with eclectic vehicles. “Another Man’s Treasure” tells the story of what at first appears to be a similar venue but in fact turns out to be…“a collection”. For the most part nothing is for sale here.

I spent the better part of a day with the owner exploring the grounds and taking pictures. I have known Bob Farwell for many years and consider him a friend. Yes, he’s a chatterbox but if you are willing to listen, he has many interesting stories to tell. He is bright, resilient, insightful, kind of heart and as passionate about automobiles as any person I’ve ever met.

And then there’s “the collection”…Wow. I have to admit that my reaction to it was somewhere between fascination and horror. The tour of his compound left me reeling. I had very mixed emotions about what I’d seen and that makes it difficult to write about. Then a few weeks later I received word that he’d had a fire and a portion of his collection was destroyed. The news made me nauseous but I imagined that it was devastating to him. At that point I decided that the second part of my story would never be published- then I ran into Farwell at a swap meet. I offered my condolences and told him of my decision. Much to my surprise, he was disappointed! In spite of everything, he wanted to see a story about his collection in print.

So here it is. It is not my best work. It is not the story I initially intended to write. It’s not much of story at all but fortunately…the photographs speak for themselves.

Bob Farwell is a collector of a different sort. He collects antique cars, race cars from different eras and much, much more. There is a collection of radio controlled airplanes, small industrial engines and mechanical oddities. What appears at first to be a scrapyard is in actuality an uncategorized assemblage. Every object is somehow meaningful to Farwell and worthy of saving. Every object has a story attached- a story that Farwell is anxious to tell. I think in many cases the stories are of more value than the objects themselves.

Farwell has had an interesting life full of ups and downs. He has been a championship winning race car owner. He has lost one of his best friends (due to heart failure) in a midget that he owned. He is the former owner of Cottage Grove Speedway and readily admits to losing a fortune in that endeavor but expresses no regrets. Until very recently, he owned a successful bar and grill adjacent to the State Fairgrounds. And of course, he still owns an amazing collection of race cars. They include:

A 1957 Grant King Big Car powered by a 302 c.i. GMC engine. King was a master race car builder of Chinese descent with strong ties to the Pacific Northwest. Eventually he settled in Indianapolis where he built numerous racers that compete in the Memorial Day Classic
.
The Rennsport house midget. A 70’s era bullet propelled a 165 c.i. “Staggerfire” V-4 engine. This potent racer was driven by some of the best short trackers in the business including Jimmy Sills and Jan Opperman.

An extremely rare Don Edmunds-built, rear engine midget powered by an Auto-Craft (Full race Volkswagen) engine. This car was campaigned in the Pacific Northwest but remains a bit of a mystery. Edmunds acknowledged having built the car to Farwell but it is not mentioned in the exhaustive biography on Edmunds published by Paul Weisel, Jr. last year.

Rebel Rally

The goldRush Rally is the craziest exotic car parade that you have never heard of. If you have heard of it, then you probably stumbled upon it somewhere in the back roads of the United States or caught ‘dope’ pictures on social media.

Though it is referred to as a ‘rally,’ those who organize it are adamant that no street racing is to be tolerated. This is not a cross-country barnstorming, but more of a wild group road trip. Almost 200 participants sign up to caravan in their Lamborghinis, Porsches, Ferraris, McLarens, and more. There are no restrictions on makes, models, or years of the participating cars, though most that are entered are considered to be ‘exotic.’

Each year, the route changes. For the special ten-year anniversary this June, expedition stopped in ten metropolitan cities from Boston to Las Vegas. Lasting little over a week, they happened to swing through the Indianapolis Motor Speedway for an afternoon.

There is nothing subtle about a fleet of candy-colored supercars arriving at your office- especially on a grey Tuesday morning. This was the VIP group, which included nascar Champion and 2014 Indy500 starter Kurt Busch driving a menacing 2018 Ford GT and former Seahawks Defensive End Cliff Avril in his own Black Panther themed ride. All of a sudden, there was a spectacle. These magnificent cars were a taste of the 200-odd legion on their way.

“We get guys from all over the country” explained one of the drivers named Geoff. “Most own their own cars, but sometimes you’ll get someone from another country that rents a new Lambo or something just to participate.”
Geoff Fear owns a luxury watch company that sponsors the series and has been an eager participant since the beginning. Decked out in Premiere Jewelry logos and goldRush stickers, Fear rocked a classic Gulf paint scheme this year on his McLaren 570S. Every car sports their own unique design and attitude – each wilder than the next.
Geoff represents most that run this rally. This tradition has turned from a lighthearted week of parties and supercar spectacle to a close-knit reunion. “This is my family and I look forward to this every year,” he said earnestly before smirking and adding “There is something about running from the cops that really brings people together.”

As one can imagine, discretion is not the goal of this organization. No matter the city, a crowd gathers. This often times includes the Fuzz. Sometimes the police are present to provide an escort, and sometimes they are present to provide tickets. The series rules specifically state:

“The goldRush Rally (the “Rally”) is not a race. You must not compete in any manner with other participants. You must not place any bets of any kind in relation to the Rally… You must comply with all applicable laws and regulations of the City, County, State, and Country in which you are present at any given time during the Rally, including but not limited to all speed regulations, laws of the road, etc.”

But being pulled over is a regularity. Speeding tickets are a mark of pride but not getting caught is the ultimate prize.
From the Golden Gate Bridge to the Las Vegas strip, goldRush embodies a new type of gearhead. It is luxury, it is humor and it captures the elusive idea of ‘cool.’ There is an outlaw vibe here and the cast of characters has no shortage of personality. In their mission statement, goldRush even refers to themselves as both a ‘social event’ and a ‘lifestyle brand’ and travel days are almost exclusively covered with new media platforms like Instagram and YouTube. Besides a presence at sema, this organization’s focus is not on media attention — but bringing like-minded people together.

This is a tribe and yet another flavor of car culture, one that is still creating their own mark and community. These guys have a mix of crazy eccentricities and attitude. In a word, these guys are rebels.

Petersen Collector Car’s Roseburg Auction

Roseburg in July is a great place to be for people who like hot rods, old cars. street rods etc. “Graffiti Weekend” as its called, offers car shows, cruise-ins, circle track racing, collector car auctions and more. There is something for everyone and it’s not actually just the weekend. This year it started on July 4 and lasted into the weekend. Some may say that the 4th stretches the events out to make it a long weekend and I can see that. Suffice to say, there is something going on every day that’s bound to appeal to many.

The Petersen Collector Car Auction at the Douglas County Fair Grounds is the one I like the best. This year’s auction offered a great array of interesting cars for sale. Not all of them old cars necessarily but many were, both stock and modified. The inventory represented a very diverse selection of rigs ranging from the 1920’s to a late model 2013 hi-rise Dodge Diesel 4 X 4, as well as Corvettes, Jags, BMW’s, and motorcycles. The responsive viewing audience of 400 plus with nearly 300 registered bidders purchased 45% of the 80 vehicles that were consigned. Curt and Susan wanted to say, “Thank you to everyone that participated in the Roseburg Graffiti Weekend Auction.”

This company is an Oregon family owned and operated business that holds three auction a year, in a couple different locations. Every sale typically has a great selection of cars to choose from and this year didn’t disappoint. I’ve bought and sold cars at these auctions and have always gone home happy. Curt and Susan Davis put together a wide variety of cars and trucks to sell and they enlist their family and friends to make these one-day events fun and enjoyable. Please follow them on Facebook and watch the website www.petersencollectorcars.com for the next auction coming in the fall.

Memorabilia sells first in the “warmup auction,” which includes beautiful and well built “man cave items” like custom phone booths, service station type yard lights, combination air & water stands and petroleum signs, provided by Pedersens Petro Retro of Roseburg, Oregon. They will be happy to “custom build” to your color scheme and product designs to fit your personal needs. Call Brent @ 541-868-5222.

Seventeen-Year-Old Wins 58th Annual Rose Cup Race

PORTLAND, Ore. (July 19, 2018) — The Rose Cup Races concluded its 58th year running this past weekend at Portland International Raceway (PIR). The Pacific Northwest’s premier amateur road racing event featured racing competitors from both the Oregon Region Sports Car Club of America and the Cascade Sports Car Club, competing in four amateur race groups: Spec Racer Ford, Great American Stock Car Series, Spec Miata, and a Vintage race group.

This year’s event also highlighted the return of professional sports car racing to PIR for the first time since 2009. The Pirelli World Challenge, considered North America’s top GT production-based road racing sports car series, brought more than 20 different manufacturers and 40 separate models to the Rose Cup Races, with four race groups and seven classes. The weekend marked the first time Pirelli World Challenge has raced in Portland since 2005.

The official winner of Sunday’s 58th Rose Cup race was the team of teenager Parker Chase and veteran Ryan Dalziel, who drove their Audi R8 LMS to victory in the GT SprintX feature. Chase, a 17-year-old from New Braunfels, Tex., scored his first GT Overall win. Dalziel, a multi-time GT race winner, started the race in the No. 19 Audi and was running third when he passed off the car to the teenager. Chase is the youngest driver in the history of the event to win the Rose Cup.

“It was terrific to work with PIR, the local sports car clubs and the Pirelli World Challenge folks to bring professional sports car racing back to Portland,” said Gary Bockman, President of Friends of PIR (FOPIR), the organizer of the event. “The hot weather matched the hot action on the race track, that’s for sure. We thank the many volunteers that made this event possible and we are already looking forward to the 59th Rose Cup Races in 2019.”