Petersen Roseburg Auction

Graffiti Weekend in Roseburg Oregon has a lot of things going on every July. One of the happenings is the Petersen Collector Car Auction, held at the Douglas County Fair Grounds.

This year offered a number of very nice collector cars. As usual the auction was well attended. My friend Bill Nelson and I have been making a habit of going to this auction each year for the last several. There were some great deals to be had. I shoulda bought that last car across the block… what a dummy I am.

The 60 Biscayne was really nice and it went to a new home. So did a very nice 63 Chevrolet Impala.

Petersen’s Auction is a family owned and operated, Oregon based company that really does a great job with each of their auctions, usually three per year. This one in Roseburg in July and two in Salem, one in the fall and one typically in February. Check them out either as a buyer or a consigner. You might find your next old car treasure, or you could thin your own herd.

Visit their web site www.petersencollectorcars.com to see what’s coming up on the block in Salem September 28.th Or call Curt or Susan @ 541-689-6824.

Model Citizen

As far as I know, kids don’t build plastic model kits anymore. In the early sixties when I grew up, they were hugely popular. Models were available almost anywhere toys were sold- drug stores, hobby shops, five and dimes, even grocery stores. If you attended a boy’s birthday party in 1963, you were likely to see several model kits cheerfully received.

Even my older brother (who seemed to me devoid of creative DNA) was a capable model builder and assembled a pair of Austin Healy 3000s. He wasn’t interested in embellishment however, so they received no paint or decals. Me? I couldn’t accept the tires being the same hue as the fenders. Applying paint and decals was the best part!

Hawk released their Weird-Ohs kits (Digger, Davey and Daddy) in ’63 and when we saw them, we had to have ‘em! Artist Bill Campbell (clearly inspired by Big Daddy Roth) produced some truly unbelievable box art. I slammed together Digger in his bucket-T and couldn’t goop on the pigment fast enough. The result was always a disappointment but I was hooked. MODEL PAINTS! Didn’t you love those little quarter ounce bottles? They had a load of ‘em wherever models were sold. The Weird-Ohs were right up our alley and I procured “Freddy Flameout” and several of the “Silly Surfers” when they became available.

The first realistic car model I remember attempting was a ’69 Barracuda. This bad boy deserved special treatment so I stepped up and purchased one of those slightly larger glass jars of metallic bronze paint. I was in such a hurry to get to the finish in fact, that I glued the hood shut so I didn’t have to mess with an engine build. Naturally I didn’t own a decent brush and very likely didn’t possess any thinner but I was undeterred. I proceeded to apply numerous coats of thick enamel hoping my brush strokes would magically disappear on their own (they didn’t). A week later when my ’Cuda was dry enough to touch, it still looked like crap. Application of decals was my last resort but there simply weren’t enough decals on the sheet to disguise my horrific paint job. Defeated, the Barracuda took its rightful place in the garbage can and I took a hiatus from model building.

Before long, an older brother (or perhaps it was “Mike” down the street) presented me with a solution: rattle cans. Custom colors were expensive but almost any can of spray paint would do. Whether dad bought it to touch up a fender or mom purchased it for a craft project, it would certainly go on smoother than brush paint. I remember Mike donating a “Little Red Wagon” drag truck for me to experiment on and the result was stunning. I shot it flat black then added a canary yellow spatter effect! I was so proud of the result that I entered it in a model contest- which I lost. The judges sited shoddy workmanship but I’m convinced that they agreed my paint job was awesome! The good news was that I was back!

Mike and I both entered the next model contest. He built a cam-backed dune buggy called “a Shelako GT” and I assembled a Porsche 904 racer. I think we pooled our allowance money for a rattle can of Appliance White paint. We didn’t win that competition either but the Porsche received an Honorable Mention (mostly thanks to Mike’s tutelage). Armed with a little encouragement I was ready to tackle something more challenging. I requested an eighth scale trike motorcycle model called “the King Chopper” for Christmas. It was the first model I ever assembled with a ton of detail and I was pleased with the finished product. I got to display it on one of my mom’s knick knack shelves in our family room (for about a week!) I believe that was the final build of my childhood.

If my model building experience had ended with the Barracuda fiasco, I probably wouldn’t have ventured back into it once I retired. I have discovered that I am a much better model builder now than I was in my youth. For one thing I now have patience which I didn’t possess as a child, allowing glue and paint sufficient time to cure. For another I have a little expendable income, affording me quality supplies like good brushes and plenty of paint thinner. Lastly, the paint they put in rattle cans these days is much improved. If you can follow directions, you can lay down a paint job as good as Earl Scheib.

If you built models back in the day, I encourage you to try it again. For me it is as much fun now as it ever was. If you‘ve never tried it, for whatever reason…What do you have to lose?

MECUM Auctions Portland 2019

June 2019 brought the MECUM Auction Company to Portland Oregon again for another nationally televised collector car auction. For us old car nuts, these are always exciting with hundreds of collector cars in one place to view and to buy.

I sold my 66 Biscayne at the Las Vegas Mecum Auction last year. That was exciting and I can tell you that these folks are absolutely great to work with, very professional, very helpful and full of integrity.

This years Portland Auction saw hundreds of cars “cross the block,” and by my calculations had nearly a 59% sell through. The Mecum auction is a “reserve” auction, meaning the owner can put a minimum amount he or she will accept for their car. Of course, the owner can “lift” the reserve as the car is on the block if the bid doesn’t reach their minimum but gets close, spurring him or her to do so. If you are in attendance you might hear “the reserve is off.” This sometimes causes the bidders to increase their bids/efforts since now they know they are going to actually buy the car of their dreams. Many cars cross the block with “NO RESERVE.” You’ll see a sticker, usually in the upper center of the windshield, with a capitalized NR. This means these cars will sell to the highest bidder.

Speaking of Dream Cars… Too bad I’m not rich. I would have bought a few cars at this year’s auction. There was a Nova SS that I particularly liked. Coincidently, a friend of mine liked it too and was watching it closely. The bid went higher that he and his wife were willing to go but it sold and went to a new home.

There were what I would call some “real deals” there too. One I liked was a 49 or 50 Studebaker with a later Studebaker V-8 engine, updated newer Cadillac interior and flames. It was an older build, showing some use but I thought is was a deal for around $6500 at the hammer. One could have driven it to a cruise the next day after the auction. Instant fun for that low of a price, what a deal.

I anticipate the Mecum Auction Company will be back again next June so if you’re selling or looking to buy, plan on getting your car consigned early, in the spring 2020 or if your in the market for another addition to your stable, mark you calendar for next year. You can find consignment info etc. at www.mecum.com.

EVENING ORCHID BLUES

Summer is funny. We long for it as the chills of February wrestle toward the Spring which March promises, only to be doused in the rains of April/May. June breaks through with clearing skies and the Sun rises and sets later each day, stinging our skin with that desired heat and the Earth awakens and thrives. July continues on with the heat of Summer as the skies darken bit by bit earlier each evening as the heat of August in the throes of angst fights for all of Summer’s worth, fights against the return of Autumn.

It was in August of 1970 that I first remember how amazing the heat and colours of the season were, especially reflected across the hood of a 1965 Pontiac GTO. It was the family car, if you can imagine that. 4 speed, hopped up 389 beneath the hood and she had left the factory in that amazing colour offered by GM for one year only,

Evening Orchid.

Not really silver, far from purple. Think of a sunset in August, after the sun has had its way and baked the Earth for all she is worth before returning to rest in the West. The sky is alight for a short period of time before night and dusk. Add a shimmer of pearl and one will see what the design staff at GM did in the launch of the 1965 line up of cars.

Evening Orchid.

Scientist report that solid memories for an infant/child start at about 4 years old or later. I can see this car still in my dreams. I am there in the driveway helping (?) my Dad as he is washing down the bucket seats. Just above us on the patio on top of the garage is my beautiful Mom holding my sister who is just almost 2. The sky is alive with colours. That bright white interior, chrome reversed wheels, with simulated knock off center caps, red line tires, and that colour.

Evening Orchid.

That ’65 GTO was in my life for 7 years, but the memories she created are endless. My Aunt recalls how on a trip to New Mexico, she told me stories and put me to sleep as the miles rolled past. I remember my cousins telling me stories about Uncle Barry and the rides they were given. Tales of shrieking tires, hard shifts and how the howl of that stout 389 made them want to have a car like that GTO.

Evening Orchid.

I hold a handful of photographs. Mom, my sister. Dad, me, my baby brother near that 1965 GTO. Years have rolled by and that car is now something which is out of my grasp. I remember the last ride in her on County Line road. The sounds of that 389 thrashing against the night, the headlights chasing that dual lane road and laughter as my Dad drove the ’65 hard enough to make us kids feel alive.

Evening Orchid.

Light the Night Car Cruz

First off, I would like to give a shout out to my car club Street Magic of Portland who has been around now for 40 years. We share this anniversary with Johnny Limbo and the Lugnuts. They recently celebrated theirs and they brought back all of their old band members on that night. And that was something else.

I also need to give a shout out to the Northwest Motorsports Association for the recent Light the Night Car Cruz that was held down in Gladstone. It sure was fun taking over that town. Check out the video. And they have since taken a vote. And they will be coming back next year, so be ready.  Also there is another Gresham Cruise coming right  up. Check out PDX Car Culture on the Web for the details.

And so now it is time to get back down to the subject of talking about the future of automobiles, a subject I bring up quite often here. So you may know that GM had made an attempt to team up with Rivian, but that didn’t fly. Just as a reminder, Rivian are the ones that are developing EV pickup trucks. So the latest word is that GM is thinking about reviving the Hummer and it will become an EV.

And of course we cannot ever stop talking about Elon the Muskfather. He has been driving around in his own AV.  And we have mentioned that they are building their own batteries and now it looks like they are looking at getting into mining the rare earth materials needed to build batteries. And that does have some significance considering the China trade wars.
Then, he’s talking about developing their own in-house Auto insurance. And then there was something about a submarine car. Then there is the China gigafactory coming. That is all coming together and he wants to have one of those on every continent.

Let us continue with some news from Autoline Daily. Soon we will see Dominos delivering their pizzas with AVs. Now let’s roll into some other stuff.

As far as ICE is concerned, it looks like the world is moving away from the V8 power trains. We will be looking at three four five and six inline program engines. Developers are designing interchangeable parts that will work on all of these engines. This will be put to use in hybrids in other countries.

And then, perhaps some of you have heard that Ford is gearing up to deliver a hybrid Mustang.

Next we have Federal-Mogul announcing something about a transient plasma ignition. It will burn through the entire combustion process faster and cleaner. There will no longer be a flame front like many of us racers have dealt with. Another thing that is coming is dual fuel injection.

Soon we will be seeing 48 volt mild hybrids which will give more torque. They are calling this eTorque. And expect to see electric turbos that will eliminate turbo lag. Next there is this other thing called skip fire injection which will be used to deactivate cylinders. And I don’t want to talk any more about that because I’m getting tired.

But wait there is more. Staying with internal combustion engines, we are hearing about water injection. Looks like Mercedes-Benz and BMW are working on using the condensation from the air conditioner to be routed back into the gas.
Also, I should say that the bean counters are saying that the US will be the late adopter in this world wide change. We’ll be hanging onto the internal combustion longer than the rest of the world. I guess it is only fitting seeing as how we are the ones who started this whole ruckus in the first place.

I should add that these cars are getting smarter. Not only will they be getting harder to work on but they will tattle on you. Just sayin’.

And now I would like to conclude this with a few tidbits from the racing world. It looks like Volkswagen broke out this IDK, EV out at Goodwood. It just took away the long standing  track record from McLaren F1. They ran the course in less than four minutes, the first car to ever do that!

Finally we have good old Don Garlits. Here is a man who has set many records in his lifetime. And he has been working with this EV dragster. He is shooting for 200 mile per hour. By the time this issue goes to press we will know whether or not he was able to accomplish that.

See the video at gearheadsworld.blogspot.com. And that is it.

Chuck Fasst, #GearHeadsWorld

Davey Hamilton: A Hero in My Eyes

Have you ever had someone you met a long time ago, never to see them again for more than 25 years? The only connection you have is to have read about him in newspapers, magazines and seen him on TV. This story is about me and Davey Hamilton.

Back in 1987 I started taking photos of supermodifieds here in the Northwest. That is how and where I met Davey, a shaggy blond haired kid in an offset supermodified at the Portland Speedway. At first introduction it was clear that we had a lot in common and got along well. Every track I saw him at he always had a smile.

I followed Davey’s career around different tracks in the Northwest and California. One time a few years later I was working as a volunteer at the Portland 200 Indy car race at Portland International Raceway. The race weekend was always The Open Wheel Spectacular at the Portland Speedway on Saturday night and the Portland 200 on Sunday.

Davey had developed into one of the top open wheel drivers in the Northwest. At the race at the speedway Davey was wanting to meet some of the Indy car owners. Early Sunday morning Davey and I went to the raceway and to the pit/paddock area where he introduced himself to the Hemelgarn Racing Team and to A. J. Foyt. And as they say—the rest is history.

Before we leave the world of supermodifieds here is a little information why Davey is a hero in my eyes. Several years of going to different race tracks in the Northwest, I would take my son, Tim, to the races with me. Every time we would see Davey he would shake Tim’s hand, call him by name and tell him to have a good time. One of the top racers knowing Tim’s name and talking to him is why he is a hero to me. He paid attention to everyone, even young fans.

You have to start somewhere. Davey’s first race car a long time ago was a home built roadster with a 230 cubic inch, 6 cylinder and a 1 barrel carb. He raced at Firebird Speedway in Idaho. From that he went to the powerful offset supermodifieds. Davey’s favorite super was the Trigueiro Motorsports Super. With that car and crew he won 1987, 1988, and 1989’s Northwest Supermodified Racing Association Driver’s Championship. Also, he won the Western States Supermodified Racing Association Championship in 1994 as well as the Copper Classic at Phoenix International Raceway at least twice in the supermodified division.

On to bigger and better things- open wheel racing, Indy lights, CART Indy car, Indy Racing League and the Indianapolis 500. In order to have the opportunity to try out for the 500 you have to pay. In Davey’s case he traded the homebuilt race car his dad, Kenny Hamilton had used in his attempt to qualify for the 500. In 1982 Kenny’s car, the Eagle Aircraft Special tried but did not make the 500. The unique car caught the eye of Ron Hemelgarn. Ron wanted the car for his museum, The car was traded to give Davey a tryout for the 500 in 1991.

Now for some statistics, Davy raced Indy cars 1991 to 2001 and then 2007 to 2011, though he did not win a race in 56 races he finished second in points in 1996, 1997 and 1998. Davey did race for several different teams throughout this time.
Then came the accident, a wreck involving three other drivers including Davey. He slammed into the retaining wall at the Texas Motor Speedway, crushing both legs and feet. After 23 operations and a long recovery, Davey’s desire to race again at the 500 came true in 2007 through 2011.

Then came retirement, he worked as a radio broadcaster and partnered with several racing associations. He became a race car team owner in Indy cars, USAC sprint cars, King of Wings sprint cars. He was also racing Stadium Super Trucks and back to racing supermodifieds at Oswego Speedway in New York.

With the Indy cars coming back to Portland, I thought I could find Davey, knowing that he has worked for several Indy teams. I put together a photo album of Davey and all the supers he drove throughout the years in the Northwest. Well, he was not in Portland that weekend. He was racing a super at Oswego Speedway.

Going to the Indy 500 this year, I was hoping to see him and I did find him, working for Harding Steinbrenner Racing with car number 88, driver Colron Herta. Davey’s job is a coordinator and advisor using all his knowledge to make the car go faster. Davey was very busy, after all it was the Indy 500.

Davey asked if I could meet him at Lucas Oil Raceway Park. As a car owner he had a USAC pavement sprint car racing there. I did meet up with him and gave him the photo album. We talked about the old days and what the future holds. He says his legs feel great, and as far as the future, he plans to stay involved in racing, Indy cars, team ownership and driving.

Whenever I interview anyone I always ask, “What was what was the first car you drove on the road?” This is where Davey and I have something in common . We both drove our mother’s cars, his mom’s a 1971 Torino and mine a 1962 Galaxie. Also in common we both had minor incidents. Davey ran into the garage door and I went into a shallow ditch. So even heroes are human!

The Worst Racing Movie Ever Made

Whilst sitting around a room of young racing aficionados, empty cans were strewn about the table surface and a forgotten slice of cold pizza sitting unwanted in the corner, somebody asked “What is the best racing movie ever made?” a chorus of answers was quick to reply “Senna!” “Rush!” and my personal favorite, “Grand Prix!” Sadly the congregation of twentysomething-year-olds stared back at me with a blank expression- their cinematic catalog peters out pre-1990 and everything made prior is sadly rendered obsolete.

“Days of Thunder!” Somebody slurred and instantly an argument broke out about whether or not the 1990 NASCAR flick starring Tom Cruise was actually under serious consideration for the prestigious Best Racing Movie title.

“Driven!” the same guy yelled and everyone laughed. This was clearly a joke. No true-blue race fan in their right mind would pass over LeMans, Winning, or even Talladega Nights for Driven.

A passerby walked back into the room and said, “I have never seen Driven.” Unanimously we decided that it was vitally important that a screening was in order. Couches, chairs and a TV were immediately shoved into the adjoining living room and someone dove into the corner of stacked DVDs in search for Driven.

Made in 2001, Driven stars Kip Pardue, Til Schweiger, and Estella Warren. (Who?) Sylvester Stallone and Burt Reynolds are supposed to be leading men but their storylines are barely a step above a cameo. Women, crowd shots and dramatic one-liners pepper this somewhat confusing storyline. Guys are stealing each other’s girlfriends; cars are being launched 50 feet into the air and frosted tips hairstyles are present.

A personal favorite scene includes a spontaneous chase sequence through the streets where neither driver is wearing any sort of safety features in open cockpit IndyCars. I guess we, as an audience, are supposed to believe that these guys are actually chatting with each other between midtown traffic while going close to 200mph.

One of the guys in the viewing party had a particular problem with how the characters in the movie put their gear on in the wrong order before strapping into the car. “HEY BUCKO, NO RACE CAR DRIVER TAKES HIS HELMET OFF, THEN HIS GLOVES! IT WOULD BE TOO HARD TO UNDO THE STRAPS” he yelled. When the dust settled, credits rolled, and the fridge was out of beer we all sat around and continued the conversation from earlier in the night.

“The McLaren documentary was really good.” “I have been watching the Formula 1 docuseries on Netflix, Drive to Survive—that’s really good too.” “I’ve never heard of Winning, who is in that?” Could all be heard over one another.

“Guys,” I said, “we are never going to agree on what the Greatest Racing Movie Ever Made is, but I think we can all safely say what the Worst Racing Movie Ever Made is…”

20 Racing that are More Worth Your
Time than Driven:
1- (2013)
The Big Wheel – (1949)
Days of Thunder – (1990)
Drive to Survive- Series – (2019)
Dust to Glory – (2005)
Le Mans- (1971)
Grand Prix – (1966)
McLaren – (2017)
Patrick Dempsey: Racing Le Mans series – (2013)
Rush – (2013)
Talladega Nights – (2006)
The Love Bug – (1968)
To Please A Lady – (1950)
Senna – (2010)
Snake and Mongoose – (2013)
Stoker Ace – (1983)
Viva Las Vegas – (1964)
Weekend of a Champion- (1972)
Winning – (1969)
World’s Fastest Indian- (2005)

Springhill North Albany Car Show

A small group of folks have been hosting a cool show in North Albany each July for the past seven years. The show was held on Sunday, July 14th and traditionally coincides with the National Collector Car Appreciation Day weekend. (National Collector Car Appreciation Day was Friday, July 12th this year.) David Faller, a town resident created the event with the premise of giving back. For the past few years, South Willamette Valley Honor Flight has been the recipient of the monies raised.

Honor Flight was organized to recognize veterans for their service to our country by sending them to their respective memorials in Washington DC. They were a large presence at the show, and good reason for large turn-out. Trophies, plaques and lots of raffle items add to the excitement of the day that is crammed with beautiful cars, trucks, military and emergency vehicles. ”Pin Ups for a Cause” and the ”Battling Betties” add flavor to the nostalgia of the event. Our Nation’s armed services were represented with the multitude of veterans who either own collector vehicles or came as spectators. Grateful past-participants of Honor Flights were there too.

When Registration opened at 08:00, a flood of vehicles passed through the gates. During the first hour, close to one hundred vehicles were already on the field—the tenth fairway actually. Anxious participants had lined up early on the road to the Springhill North Albany Golf and Event Center and overflowed onto Springhill Road itself. At 09:00 a color guard presented The Flag, and “Praise in 3D” sang the National Anthem. Show cars rolled in all day long for the charitable assembly.

Mr. Faller posted on The Springhill North Albany Car Show Facebook page: ”The 7th annual Springhill North Albany Car Show is in the books and by all indications was a huge success. We had 211 fantastic vehicles on the 10th fairway of an awesome venue, terrific food vendors and other vendors, fantastic raffle items, great crowds that were having a great time, and we made a lot of money for South Willamette Valley Honor Flight. We should know the total amount in a few days. I want to thank our tremendous staff for planning this awesome event. We started in early February and are starting to think about next year’s show, which will be on Sunday, July 19, 2020.”

Ed Bock, director of the South Willamette Honor Flight told me that in addition to the anticipated monies from the show car registration, “The proceeds from just these two raffle areas (and the 50/50 raffle) are enough to send two veterans to DC”. Last year’s show generated a $6,179.20 check to Honor Flight. Although tallies were not in at press time, Bock and Faller expect another record amount will have been generated.

Rickreall Auto Swap Meet – Full of Surprises

On the first Sunday in June (the 2nd this year) I attended a surprisingly good swap meet at the Polk County Fairgrounds in Rickreall. Twenty two years ago three swappers: John Gilbert, Tom Pryor and James Cummins organized this event and it has been going strong ever since. This year the attendance was about the same as usual but the number of vendors was up- “One hundred and seventy,”according to Gilbert. “The first year we made about $250 profit,” he chuckles, “but we kept it going.” At some point Cummins pulled out but he has remained supportive as a vendor. (For vendors) “It’s kind of like gambling,” Gilbert says, “You never know if someone will be looking for what you put out there. Hopefully you more than cover your expenses and have fun.”

Admittedly, I was bit skeptical at first. The $6 admission price seemed like a gamble to me because I couldn’t see much beyond the ticket booth. But once I navigated the corral, I realized I was just getting started. Behind that, stood a barn full of vendors and beyond that more open space and a couple more barns. In addition, there was a grassy area with some sharp Rods and Customs on display- Always a nice bonus. As far as the merchandise offered, it was pretty much standard swap meet fare- some new items, some rusty gold. An early fifties Nash with a Ford engine and tranny, a guy selling his Crosley projects, a very restorable Cushman Scooter, a guy with a bunch of advertising (mostly framed posters by the time I got there.) He assured me that his best stuff had sold early and I believed him.

I came away with some smalls: a couple cans, a keychain, etc. I was happy. Incidentally, there is a decent flea market going on concurrently and for another dollar, you can explore that. This is held the first Sunday of each month about nine times a year. I found my best treasure there; a Bob’s Big Boy salt shaker from the 1950’s. Also the snack bar rocks! I shall plan to attend this function again next year but I’ll get there early!

Fave Five

This year when I made my annual pilgrimage to Indianapolis, I found a handful of race cars that I had never expected to see. Between the contemporary Indy cars, the cars on display in the museum, the seventy plus privately owned Indy cars on exhibit in tents next door, etc. I inspected literally hundreds of race cars. Of all the cars I looked at, these were my Five Favorite.

The Cummins Diesel Company based in nearby Columbus, Indiana entered diesel powered racers in the 500 on five different occasions. Their entry in 1931 was the first car to cover the distance without A SINGLE STOP (placing 13th). The early diesels tended to by heavy and boxy looking but not their final entry in 1952. Cummins spent over a half million dollars building this low, streamlined roadster for Freddie Agabashian to pilot and he stuck it on the pole. The six cylinder was slow coming up to speed but it’s four lap average was 138 mph; a new track record. On Memorial Day it fell back when its supercharger became clogged with hot dog wrappers and crap it picked up off the track. At seventy laps it was belching black smoke and withdrawn from competition. Ironically “Fast Freddie” had predicted this and suggested the engineers create another air intake in the hood. Not wanting to disturb the aesthetics of their design, Team Cummins had refused.

Ken Wallis had nearly won the 1967 Indy 500 with his original turbine car design, penned for STP president Andy Granatelli. His services were retained by Carroll Shelby in 1968 and with funding provided by clothier Botany 500, the next evolution of his side by side layout became a reality. In an attempt to reign in the turbine, USAC had put new restrictions on the size of its intake and Wallis had gotten around that by designing an annulus that opened at speed like the aperture of a camera. This of course was illegal and when Shelby chief engineer Phil Remington saw what Wallis had in mind, he resigned on the spot. Can Am racing champions Denny Hulme and Bruce McLaren were hired to drive but were unable to attain a competitive speed. When Mike Spence was killed practicing in one of Granatelli’s new Lotus Turbines, Shelby saw a way to save face. He called a press conference an announced that he was withdrawing his entries for “safety reasons”. Both cars disappeared for the next fifty years- It’s amazing to me that they still exist.

Meanwhile a few garages over, hot rodder Mickey Thompson was preparing for his final assault on the Brickyard. It had been four years since a Thompson entry had made the show and he was no longer building his own cars. Instead the “City of Long Beach Special” was constructed by San Franciscan Joe Huffaker who had a solid history of putting cars in the lineup. Actually the number #63 was the more conventional of two Huffaker “Wynn’s Specials” that Thompson had entered in ’67. Drag racer Danny Ongais was to make his rookie debut in the mount but it was fellow rookie Bill Puterbaugh that eventually strapped in. Sadly, the car which featured a small block Chevrolet with multi-valve heads of Thompson’s manufacture never ran well enough to make a qualifying attempt. Today, I am pleased to report, that current owner George Lyons appears to have the Huffaker fully sorted and running fine.

Aforementioned Kiwi’s Denny Hulme and Bruce McLaren were the dominate force in Can Am racing in 1969 but it wasn’t like the other guys weren’t trying. With support from Dearborn, Holman Moody stuffed a 500 cubic inch Ford monster into a two year old McLaren and strapped Mario Andretti in the cockpit. As per usual the diminutive Italian/American rose to the occasion and qualified third fast in his initial outing. After a little R and D the team reappeared for the last three events of the season. At Laguna Seca Andretti qualified seventh and finished fourth. At Riverside he started sixth and finished third and at Texas he split Team McLaren and qualified in the front row. At the drop of the green flag Andretti blasted into the lead and led for four laps before genading the engine. Clearly the car had potential, only the commitment was lacking. The “429er” (as it was referred to) was a no-show at the thirty and fifty year Can Am reunions and my assumption was that it no longer existed. Imagine my delight when I found it in the Mario Andretti-ICON exhibit held at the Speedway museum.

Another of Indy’s chosen sons was Jim “Herk” Hurtubise. He qualified for the 500 ten times and became a sentimental favorite of the fans. He promoted the front engine roadsters long after that technology had become obsolete. Hurtubise was a natural choice to pilot Andy Granatelli’s supercharged Novi and in 1963 he qualified it in the front row. Starting alongside was his friend Parnelli Jones and in the race they had a tremendous battle until the Novi was sidelined with an oil leak. Hurtubise watched Jones go on to win his only 500 and was among the first to congratulate him. In ’64 Herk was back in a traditional roadster but the following year he couldn’t get his entry up to speed and returned to Granatelli’s Novi. On the final weekend of time trials he put the day-glo rocket in the show with a solid qualifying effort. Unfortunately on race day he was the first retirement when his transmission failed. Knowing the Novi’s snake-bitten past and the ups and downs of Hurtubise’s career, it seems appropriate that the two be forever linked. Seeing the racer in person was an emotional experience.