Quiz Time Again in the Land of Hot Rods in Opportunity

quiz-time-feb-2016

This Hot Rod story begins back in 1958 in the little Hamlet of Opportunity, Washington.

From the center of downtown Spokane, Washington you drive ten point one and 1/2 miles due East on Hwy #10, half way between Dishman, Washington and Veradale, Washington and you arrive in the land of Opportunity. Now if your answer to the Quiz above was, 4010 and you didn’t require the assistance of a three bar calculator to arrive at this correct answer, you probably didn’t attend our Central Valley High back in the fifties.

Onward and upward the story continues, as our star athlete at CV High at this time in our school’s history was a fella by the name of  L. Sloan, we called him the “Bone Man.” It seems somehow through a dare he was able to bribe the star cheerleader, who was the sweetest, most gorgeous girl to attend CV High in the last fifty years, to accompany him as his date to the Mid-Winter Dance.

Now there was several things out of sync with this whole story. First of all the Bone Man couldn’t dance that well, off of the football field, or a basketball court, so who was going to dance with A. Janosky? We labeled her “The Queen of Broken-Hearts.” Second, he had no transportation to escort this delicious young lady to the Mid-Winter Dance. Third, His bank account was so low he was down to borrowing coins out of his dad’s antique coin collection!

In response to his outstanding effort at our last victorious football outing, beating our rival school W. Valley almost single handedly by forty points, four of us guys who always referred to “The Bone Man” as our buddy for life, came to his rescue.
The Bone Man’s brother had a slightly wrecked 1952 Chevy 4 dr sedan parked out back. It needed a paint job, but it did run, and was powered with a stock 6 cyl and had the sweetest sounding pipes off a set of Smitty glass-packs. A stock three-on-the-tree tranny got her down the highway. The rest was pretty much a worn out old stock Chevy sedan.

Now with a little help we could make that one crunched-in fender and the rear deck lid somewhat usable. The four of us pulled it out of the field and started by giving it a good wash job and even vacuumed the interior. We must have used a full can of chrome polish on just the front bumper and grill but she cleaned up moderately well.

G. Moretz was our leader and the oldest of the followers. He was one cool dude. The girls loved him as he took on the appearance of a cross between James Dean and Clint Eastwood. “The Dude” was sure he could pound that fender out to at least keep it from rubbing the tire so bad. This might keep it from screeching and smelling like burnt rubber also.

The roof area was turned over to the center of our CV High basketball team 6’ 10 ½ “ Jimmy “The Slink “ Johnson. Now here was one super quiet but deadly guy around the basket. His elbows were so boney that when you got smacked by one of them going for a rebound you never bothered doing that again. We all loved having him on our team, and boy he painted the top of The Bone Man’s car like a pro. Even the off colored polka dots added a lot of humor, and they were on the top, so unless you were six feet tall you couldn’t hardly see them.

When it came to the body and fenders Mr. D. Larsen “The Lars” and myself Colliedog B.C. took the chore on with style, going for perfection on a budget. 22 rattle cans of “Broma” Quick Ten Minute dry Chinese Red paint direct from Peters Hardware in downtown Opportunity. As it turned out 22 cans wasn’t quite enough, and of course we ran short of finishing the job by five or six cans. Now Peters Hardware was out of the Chinese Red  color and as I recall that’s why we elected to go with a fresh new look.

I myself wouldn’t have chosen that shade of pink, but Lars was the art major, and he was going for that Art Deco finished look and I think he achieved his goal. In hindsight we all agreed that had the paint dried in the ten minutes like it stated on the can, we would have had a one of a kind artistic creative automobile wonder to behold. But due to the cooler temperature in december in the land of Opportunity, our creative automobile wonder’s new paint was not dry for two to three days later.

Now the Bone Man had to use the vehicle for its intended purpose that evening so his delicious one of a kind of date had to ride to the dance in a vehicle that became a Chinese Red and Deco Pink creation in motion. The exciting thing was that The Bone Man’s 1952 Chevy was ready for use as the Queen’s carriage for the evening.

Thanks be to “The Dude” Gary for coming to Bone Man’s rescue, at the Mid-Winter Dance, as he cut into every dance just so “The Queen of the Broken Hearts” wouldn’t know that Larry didn’t  dance that well. She found out 10 years later on the night the two of them were married.

Now as for the short lived history of the 1952 Chevy: one week to the night of the Mid-Winter Dance the Bone Man in his 4dr Chevy rolled up behind my 26’ “T” Coupe, lights out and quiet as can be at Ron’s Drive In. I was sitting in the low in the front, high in the back Model “T” just getting ready to hit the road. Started her up, revved up that sweet little Flathead, put her in reverse and pop the clutch. You guessed it—the “T” smacked right into Bone Man’s freshly painted Deco laugh mobile. Totally wiped out the front end of that little Chevy. Fortunately no damage to the model “T” but both his head lights, grill and front fenders needed a lot of attention.

So in the world of quiz recapping. In the year 1958 The Lars at (16), Slink at (16), The Dude at (18),  Bone Man at (17), The Queen of Broken Hearts at (16), myself at (17) and a 1952 Deco finished Chevy 4 dr sedan had a wonderful time creating this true story from the history  of yesteryear in the land of Opportunity. Quiz Time Total = 4010.
Sadly we lost “The Dude” Gary Moretz in 1959 to a tragic death in his 1954 Mercury H/T. In 1963 “Slink” Jimmy Johnson was fatally injured coming home from college in his show class 1954 Olds 88 coupe and in 1995 our good buddy Dennis Larsen “The Lars” drove his beautiful 1994 BMW 730 I for the last time, due to a massive coronary. Their memory lives on forever in our hearts and minds.

On a more positive note: The old 1926 Ford Model “T” coupe will be celebrating her 90th birthday at the 60th Anniversary of the Portland Roadster Show on March 18-20, 2016 at the Portland Expo Center. You’re all invited to come and enjoy the festivities and say hello to the two remaining Hot Rod buddies, The Bone Man and Colliedog BC, who will be on hand cutting the Model “T’s” birthday cake.

Gene Winfield: Bio of a Rod & Custom Legend

Gene-Winfield-2015

It is hard to cover in only a couple of pages over 65 years of innovation, talent and craftsmanship that Gene Winfield has been associated with in the automotive world. He is one of the original California Customizers that started trends that would eventually cross the globe.

Gene built his first roadster in Modesto, California while in high school during World War II and hasn’t stopped since. He opened Windys custom shop in 1946. He has raced cars on the streets, dry lakes and the earliest drag strips of the country. Gene and his car club attended and also hosted some of the first hotrod shows. In 1950 while in the Army he went to Japan. While he was there he built and raced a 41 Ford. After his return from the service in 1951 Gene opened Winfield’s custom shop in Modesto where he worked on projects like Rod & Customs dream truck. Over the years he has also contributed to articles in many rodding publications and even wrote a Q&A article for Car Kulture Deluxe.

By 1960 Genes work was getting national recognition, most notably for his custom paint jobs. His eye for shades and hues led to the development of the first fully blended paint job. His canvas was the radically customized 57 Mercury dubbed the Jade Idol. It was quickly followed by another custom Mercury called the Solar Scene, a 1950 with electrically operated seats that swiveled out to greet the occupants. A couple of other famous Winfield cars are the Strip Star and the Reactor, both of which featured futuristic looking designs and handmade aluminum bodies. Both of these cars are animated with remote control devices and gadgets. These cars have won many prestigious awards at national car shows.

Gene applied his body work talents to 3 roadsters that each won the 9 foot tall “America’s most beautiful roadster” award in 1955, 63 and again in 64. By 1962 his notoriety had brought himself and several other builders to Detroit. Ford offered each customizer a new product to restyle. The “Ford custom car caravan” hit the show circuit in hopes of capturing the youth market. Four years later Gene was asked to run AMTs (a model car company) speed and custom division in Phoenix, Arizona. There they would develop full size show cars and accessories. One such creation was a plastic bodied car called the Piranha. AMT built specialty vehicles for TV shows, feature films and movies. Some of Gene’s creations were the Man from U.N.C.L.E. and Get Smart gadget cars, the Galileo shuttlecraft from the original Star Trek series, a ‘31 chevy that converted to the NEW 1967 Camaro in under a minute for the Dean Martin show, a new Impala split front to rear for a Chevrolet commercial and he has also frozen a car in a block of ice for an oil company. Some of the movies and TV shows that feature his work are Ironside,  Bewitched, Robocop, The Wraith, Magnum Force, Back to the Future II and the list goes on. In some of his spare time Gene had done stunt work for tire companies.

Some of Gene’s larger projects include 6 cars for Woodie Allen’s Sleeper and a monumental 25 cars for Blade Runner featuring Harrison Ford. Some of those cars had to be specially equipped with hydraulics to retract the wheels for a flying mode. One of them he recently restored for Paul Allen’s Science Fiction Museum in Seattle, Washington. He is also currently working with the World of Wheels series chopping tops during the shows. Last year Gene chopped 17 cars total of which 10 were done during the car shows.

In the mid-eighties custom cars were on the rise again. Gene found himself with customers wanting to get their Mercury’s chopped, sectioned and frenched again. He saw a need for repair to these old cars. He then developed a line of steel and fiberglass parts for Fords and Mercury’s to include complete 49-51 glass bodies. The glass bodies have built in features like frenched headlights and already chopped roofs. Aside from custom work and fiberglass business Gene finds time to attend many car shows and events around the world each year and even found the time to recreate his old race car “The Thing” which he races at Bonneville and El Mirage dry lake beds. Some of Genes newer creations include Maybellene, a 61 Cadillac with a Northstar engine and the Pacifica, a 63 Econoline pick up with a 5.0 mustang engine. Both vehicles feature air ride suspensions and are sporting some of Winfield’s finest signature paint jobs.

Some of Genes more recent TV work includes 2 interviews on Hot Rod TV, an interview with Dennis Cage from My Classic Car,  the Old School Chevy and Insane 54 for Monster Garage, painted a Cadillac for Billy Gibbons (ZZ Top) on TLC’s show Rides, demonstrated fabrication and painting techniques on Travel Channel’s Riding with Rossi and History channels Boys Toys Custom Cars where he also chopped a top, and 3 full size wind up cars for a Mobil oil commercial. With all that Gene is also in negotiations for his own TV show.

If that isn’t enough, Gene travels the world teaching workshops on metal fabrication to pass his experience of customizing on to future generations. When asked about current projects, a twinkle of his eye and his trademark smile was all we were able to get out of him. When asked about his age he responded the same way.  No matter what, he is still going strong and shown no signs of slowing down.

To be continued…

Gene has won too many awards and honors to
mention, but some of his best are as follows:

*Oakland/Grand National Roadster Show Hall of Fame
*Darryl Starbird’s national Rod & Custom Hall of Fame
*Kustom Kemps of America (KKOA) Hall of Fame
*San Francisco Rod & Custom Hall of Fame
*Michigan Rod & Custom Hall of Fame
*San Bernardino Route 66 Hall of Fame
*Detroit Autorama Builder of the Year
*NHRA’s lifetime achievement award “The Wally”
*Grand Marshal for Modesto’s American Graffiti Week

Once a Racer. . .

Bob-Bondurant-2015

Former Formula 1 racer Bob Bondurant is still quick.

I glimpsed his profile in passing and had to chase him back to his booth at SEMA. He was there to promote his school of high performance driving and though I respect his business savvy, I’m more interested in his previous career— that of a professional race car driver.

Is it common knowledge that Bondurant drove a Ferrari to ninth in the U.S. Grand Prix of 1965? (He was fourth the following year at Monaco in a BRM.) Do people know that he was hand-picked by Carroll Shelby to drive the original Ford Cobra? And that partnered with Dan Gurney, he finished first in class at Le Mans in ’64? These achievements were accomplished just prior to my introduction to road racing. Fortunately, I did witness Bondurant contest the 1970 Can Am series and that was what I chose to talk with him about.

Can Am historians will tell you that Team McLaren dominated the series from its inception through 1971, but they did face formidable competition. Bondurant choose the series to promote his fledgling driving school business and to showcase his driving ability. Under the banner of Smith-Oeser Racing, a two year old Lola T160 was prepared for the challenge. It was lightened and heavily modified with swoopy coachwork. Giving up little in the horsepower department, they installed a fuel injected 427ci Chevy for propulsion.

Bondurant took the controls one race into the season at St. Jovite (Canada). He struggled with engine problems in qualifying and fell out of the race with less than half the distance covered. Two weeks later when the tour made its first appearance stateside (Watkins Glen), Bondurant soldiered home fourteenth. This is a better performance than it seems as the field swelled with an influx of closed cockpit, enduro cars that compete in their own race the day before. Then it was back to Edmonton, Canada where the team put forth a solid qualifying effort. Bondurant started the contest from the eighth slot and ran well…until his engine expired with twenty laps to go. Mid-Ohio was nothing to write home about; twentieth in qualifying and an early retirement, this time due to electrical woes.

Finally in the sixth race of the season, Elkart Lake (Wisconsin) the team put it all together. Bondurant tied Team McLaren driver Peter Gethin with fifth fastest time and ran up front all afternoon. When the checkered flag fell, Bondurant was second, only one lap down to Gethin. On this Sunday he’d held nothing back and defeated among others, Peter Revson in the Lola factory entry. For the remainder of the 1970 campaign, Bondurant continued to qualify well (seventh fast at Road Atlanta, sixth at Laguna Seca and twelfth at Riverside) but his fragile Lola could not go the distance. It was easy to surmise that Bondurant was capable of running with the best and even capable of winning. If only he had the car…

For 1971 Bondurant teamed with privateer Lothar Motschenbacher and his chances for a positive result improved dramatically. Motschenbacher was a wealthy car dealer/professional racer who purchased Team McLaren’s cars at the conclusion of each season. Other than a fully tested factory effort, there were simply no better cars available. The new team underlined this point by qualifying fifth and sixth at the season opener in Mosport (Canada), and finishing the race in third and fourth place respectively. At the second outing at St. Jovite Bondurant was a tick slower than Motschenbacher, starting ninth but failed to finish the seventy five lap contest. At the third round they returned to winning form, again claiming side by side starting berths in the third row and again Motchenbacher finished on the podium. This time however, Bondurant lost oil pressure and retired at twenty laps. Spirits were sagging by the fourth round where the team could manage no better than seventh and thirteenth starting spots. It got worse in the race as Motschenbacher crashed out on lap seven. Bondurant actually finished the race in sixteenth position, a full nine laps off the winning pace. Before the fifth race of the season, the racing partnership had dissolved and only one Motschenbacher entry appeared on the grid at Mid-Ohio. It was very likely the McLaren Bondurant had driven in his last outing.

Bondurant did not return to the Can Am but continued to race professionally for another decade. When reminded of the Can Am days, a smile spreads across his face and a gleam appears in his eye. “Those cars were fun,” he asserts.
Once a racer, always a racer.

Bob-Bondurant-racer

 

24th Annual Hot Rod Reunion

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The 24th Annual California Hot Rod Reunion Presented by Automobile Club of Southern California at Auto Club Famoso Raceway near Bakersfield California is in the history books for another year.  Getting your nostalgia fix for old time drag racing is sure to be satisfied at this event.

In addition to the drag racing there is a car show/cruise-in in the “Grove” right behind the grandstands that covers about a ¼ mile with historic drag machines and new hot rods alike. Beyond that adjacent to the track there is a swap meet where you can find amazing hot rod stuff. I’ve never seen so many “Blowers” for sale, in my life, some very vintage and some not so old. There’s a vendor row between the pits and the Grove, where you can find tons of stuff. I bought a hot rod t-shirt for my newest grandson. Naturally, it was too big, but he’ll grow into it.

This event is quite a spectator event. The stands at Famoso run almost from the starting line to the finish line and they were nearly full most of the time. There were a few mishaps. A couple wrecks, some broken parts and a lot of old time front engine dragsters. Saturday night at dusk, these old race cars put on quite a show. Most of them are push start cars and the owners did just that, pushed them one at a time down the return road in front of the packed stands and lit up about 75 of ‘em. They then drove them around the Jersey barrier behind the water box and out onto the track. They idled them down the track and starting near the finish line, they parked them diagonally one by one where they sat and “Cackled” until they ran out of fuel. The line ran almost all the way back up the track to the “tree.”

By this time it was completely dark and the flames were popping out of the zoomies as they cackled until their fuel was gone. If you’ve never seen or heard a “Cackle Fest,” It’s pretty cool.

While wandering through the swap meet we stumbled onto a vendor booth operated by none other than Mr. Gene Winfield. He very graciously offered to pose for a picture and he even held up his copy of Roddin’ & Racin’ Northwest. Man, I’d love to know all the hot rod history he has experienced. A little farther down the aisle a golf cart pulled up to my buddy Jim who was wearing a vintage Ed Iskederian t-shirt and the passenger was none other than the man himself, Mr. Ed Iskenderian. He asked Jim if his shirt was an original (old) shirt, which it wasn’t, but a new reproduction of an old one.  He also asked if we used any of his cams, which we do and have and he offered his hand to this nobody and introduced himself. I was impressed with his gracious friendliness. He has been working at this hot rod stuff for a while too.

Back at the beginning of this article I mentioned there was drag racing going on, tons of it. Nitro burning rails, Funny cars, Altereds, lots of the old stuff you might remember seeing back in the sixties, gassers etc. and newer stuff as well. In the front of the pit area nearest the staging lanes there we vintage race cars, push cars/trucks, old gassers galore. It was a pretty cool weekend and it was the 24th annual, which suggests the likelihood of a 25th annual. It’s worth the trip if you like hot rods and race cars, but take your sunblock and hat because it was pretty sunny and you will definitely get burnt if you’re not protected.  Look for next years’ event again in mid to late October.

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Meltdown Drags 2014

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“Where the guys who get it go”… that is the driving thought behind the Meltdown Drags.

The crew behind the Meltdown Drags goes all out to recreate a 1966 and earlier racing weekend at Byron Dragway, and in just their 5th year they have created what many consider the top vintage drag racing event in the world. The guys putting on this amazing event have an incredible vision of what they have created, and the world who also “gets it” is responding with open arms.

At the Meltdown event you will find no bracket racing, no breakouts, no trophies, no egos, just pure sixties match racing for fun and bragging rights. What you will find is a mind blowing gathering of authentic, REAL, vintage drag cars putting on one hell of a show…not just sitting around looking pretty… racing! This year’s event featured over 500 vintage drag cars along with some amazing era correct built nostalgia cars from both Coasts and 38 States in between. Spectators poured in from the US, Canada, the U.K., New Zealand, and the list goes on. Ed Iskenderian and Bones Balogh flew in from California, and several gasser race teams showed up in force to battle it out against each other including: The Nostalgia Gasser Racing Association, The Great Lakes Gassers, The Southeast Gassers, The Ohio Outlaw A/A gassers, and many more.

Unlike many events, no one was paid to appear, and there are no payouts, or prize money, and no profit for the MDA. All fees paid at the Meltdown go directly to support the track and keep it open for people to enjoy all year. One of the major goals of the Meltdown Drags is to relive and teach the past, so if you want to take in a drag racing event that will convince you that you have stepped back in time…get on down to 2015 Meltdown Drags on July 17th -19th at Byron Dragway in Byron, Illinois See you there! meltdowndrags.com

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When It Comes to Street Rods & Custom Cars, When Does the World of Reality Really Begin?

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I remember back in the late fifties and on into the early sixties, when you attended your first new car show that came to town, and the promoters would brighten up the show by featuring some old classic custom cars and a hand full of unbelievable street-rods. In a lot of communities this was the beginning of the now famous annual street rod and custom car shows that attract tens of thousands of car enthusiasts in most cities throughout the United States and Canada every year.

Thus the story begins. I am fortunate enough to have owed my little 1926 model “T” coupe for the past fifty some years and she has treated me well since back in the mid-fifties when we tore her all apart. And thanks to a very special high school auto shop teacher, Mr. Emery, we recreated a little safer car than old Henry Ford could build back in the twenties. She has been in quite a few street rod and custom car shows over the years from Spokane to Seattle, Portland, Sacramento, Boise and even down to Hot August Nights in Reno, Nevada—some 25 plus years ago.

That’s where and when I first met Roy Collier. Roy was driving his dad’s 1950 Ford 2Dr Coupe that was showing off a pretty nice candy apple red paint job.  He was still running the little flathead in it for power and the rest of the ride was pretty much stock. In fact, it still had the hood ornament in place that looked a little out of place over that candy paint job, but Roy and his dad liked the all Ford stock look. Mr. Collier made his home in Salem, Oregon and this was just one of several cars, street rods, trucks and bikes that Roy and his dad apparently owned together.

I was making my home in Portland at the time and frequented several custom car and street rod cruise-ins as well as the world class Portland Roadster Show always held in late winter. I ran into Roy again at the Portland Show that year, but he wasn’t showing his Dad’s Ford off—he was just checking out all the rides. I spent a little time enjoying the show with him and it seemed that  every time I would pick out a car that really caught my eye, I’ll be darn if Roy and his dad would have one just like it, but just a little bit different color. I’d see a ’39 Willy’s coupe all tricked out running a big blower and sure enough Roy had one in his collection, same color and everything.

Now, I had not been to the Collier estate in South Salem before, but it sounded like from the number of cars, trucks and bikes that Roy’s family had acquired over the years that they would have to have a pretty large piece of real estate to accommodate a fantastic collection of this size. We’re talking 60 to 80 vehicles at least. “Wow! Just how private is your families car collection,” I questioned with a little more than some excitement in my voice to old Roy? “Any chance I could drive the old model ”T” down to South Salem some time and take a quick look at your world class car collection?”
“Well, of course you can,” was his reply, with or without the Model ”T”, I was always welcome.
“OK if I bring my camera?“
“Of course bring it!”

Now I have been to a few personal one-owner car collections over the years, including the Lemay in Tacoma, Harrah’s in Sparks, and the Davis family’s Pa Pa’s Toys in Cornelius, but I have got to see this very private collection at the Collier Estate in South Salem, Oregon.  We established a date that would be comfortable for all parties in question to make the trip down to Salem and it was OK to bring along my son Mike, who was visiting from California. Wow! This was going to be a fantastic day.
It was late March and there was still a cool nip in the air as Mike and I headed for South Salem. The address he directed us to was out in the area of the South Salem Golf course and I expected to find a large gated entry to this very private estate! However, as we approached we found ourselves not in a gated community but in an average little middle class housing development with medium size two car garage homes and no gated entry at this address! We were at the correct estate as there sat the candy apple red 2DR Ford a little dirtier and not quite as shiny as she looked in Reno. Well they must have the big car collection at a more secure location.

Roy saw us pull in and was at the door in no time at all, welcoming us into his dad’s home. Now where is the world class 60-80 car collection I pondered in my mind?  Roy was so busy introducing us around the table, then he asked me where the model “T” was and why hadn’t I brought it, as he had all his buddies there wanting to see it! We satisfied his request with the excuse it looked like snow in Portland and not a good drive for the “T” in questionable weather.  
My big question is “where is that big car collection of yours, Mr. Collier?”
“Oh, there all in the basement on display, awaiting your camera.”

Wow! All 92 stock cars, custom cars, street rods, trucks and bikes were downstairs awaiting my camera, with the average size of 1.18% in scale size. I truly had been snookered by my own digestive thoughts of automobile collective wonderment, and never questioned the dimensional size of the vehicles that this family had been collecting for the past 25 plus years. To this Collier family, this was a fantastic collection of American custom cars of vehicles on display that included every popular Ford, Chevy and Mopar, as well as Packards, Willy’s and Studabakers etc. in both cars and trucks. Some fantastic custom show cars, street rods, trucks and quite a few good old classic stockers.

In addition, Ron had identified each ride with a spec tab of year, engine size, mfg. number and estimated MSRP value displayed on each ride.

My son Mike and I had quite a laugh over a couple of beers when we got back to Portland that afternoon. Boy did I learn a lesson in size and dimension that day. I also learned that I wasn’t the only guy that still had his car from high school. Roy’s father Ron had his little ’50 Ford 2DR back in school also. I sure hope she’s still in their family today.
All in all it was a fantastic collection of memorable vehicles (despite the size) as well as a super fun day with my son.

Feature Car of the Month

Jerry-Klinger-1934-Dodge-PU


“It’s a gift to one’s eyes just seeing in person your gorgeous 1934 Dodge P.U.”

Happy Birthday and Merry Christmas and thank you Mr. Jerry Klinger, from Gresham Oregon, for having the vision of seeing this ride come alive after a 38 year work in progress. Now most of those 38 years were dedicated to just making a living and raising a family.  When Jerry finally retired about a year ago he decided it was now time to do something with that Dodge Pick-up.

A total body off restoration was the place to start. With a beefed up chassis and some new motor mounts to handle a 318 ci Mo Par power plant / 904 Auto Tranny and a 9” Ford rear-end really got her moving down the highway.  
Jon Lind of Springfield stitched in the delicious Banana Leather interior and B & J Zahn out in Corbett laid down that mouth-watering dark blue metallic exterior. Full torsion bar suspension and disc brakes on all four makes for an updated and comfortable ride. She sports 205×15’s in rubber up front and 235×15’s out back for a perfect stance.  
The frenched-in license plate and frenched oval crested tail lights plus the polished chrome wheels on all four corners make this a real one of a kind custom automotive creation.

We at R&R NW Publication are pleased to make this our Featured Ride of the Month for December 2015.

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1934-Dodge-interior

All for the Love of Street Rods & Custom Cars

Brad-Groff-1960-Cadillac-Eldorado-Biarritz-Convertible
Let me introduce you to a man that loves fast and fancy cars so much that he belongs to the Cascade Plymouth Car Club locally, The National Desoto Car Club and the Walter P. Chrysler International Automobile Club of America and beyond. Now one would think this dude loves nothing but Mopar cars? WRONG! He actually loves all flavors of autos that are fast, fancy and long—the longer the better. Did I mention that he also belongs to the local Rose City Thunderbird car club, The Cadillac LaSalle car club and is an active member in good standing with the Pharaohs Street Rodders Car Club here in Portland, Oregon? We at R & R NW Publications are proud to introduce you to a few of Mr. Brad Groff’s automobile artistic creations “All for the Love of Classic Custom Cars “ for December 2015.

Mr. Groff is a true Oregonian, born a mere 55 years ago right here in beautiful Portland, where he attended Grant High School and had fun for a few years in the auto shop classes. At 15 years of age, the story goes that he purchased his first ride, a ’66 Chevrolet Malibu 2 Dr H/T. Now he is a self-taught automobile operator, teaching himself how to drive. He swears he practiced for a full year in the family driveway, forwards and backwards, never once wandering out into real traffic in preparation for his 16th “B”day. Then it was off to the Oregon DMV in that ’66 Chevy Malibu, all shined up, where he promptly flunked the driving test.

Not to worry, Brad has a flawless driving record today, and makes his home in the Alameda area of Portland and his fantastic family of friends, include a nine year old Boxer dog named Dash and a wonderful 17 year old kitty cat named Waffle. Of the 20 plus cars Brad has shown over the years around the Pacific Northwest, I can’t ever remember one of them that wasn’t fast, fancy and fantastically flawless in their true creative wonder. From his delicious Rolls-Royce, His Ford “T” Bird and his Corvette Stingray along, with a host of others, Brad is truly a car kind of guy.  We at R&R NW Publication would like to thank you for sharing your story with us and our thousands of readers all over the Pacific Northwest “All for the Love of Classic Custom Cars.”

1960-De-Soto-Adventurer

1960 De Soto Adventurer 2 dr H/T

Featuring for power a ’63 413 ci Chrysler Imperial V8 with stock tranny and rear-end. The deep Adventurer Desoto Red color really makes the lines on this beauty come alive. She sports w/w on all four corners, showing off a full set of Desoto wire wheels to finish this ride off in style. For the interior, a quality black and grey leather add a nice touch. This is truly another Brad Groff super cherry flawless winning ride, as featured at the 2015 Portland Roadster show, a real winner where ever she shows.

1958-Plymouth-Belvedere-Convertible

1958 Plymouth Belvedere Convertible

For power she sports a 350 ci Golden Commando power plant with a high cam and dual quad intake with a three speed torque flight tranny. She features all electronic ignition plus disc brakes on all four. The w/w with deep polished chrome wire wheels and the Fury Bright Red color and trim really do a number on this gorgeous Plymouth Belvedere. She wears a delicious red and white interior with a touch of class. Nice ride and another winning featured car at the Portland, Salem and Eugene Car Shows.

1960-Cadillac-Eldorado-Biarritz

1960 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz Convertible

Very limited edition. Powered with a stock 390 ci mean and lean all-Caddy, she’s all stock from the tip of the nose to the tip of those wild tail fin taillights out back, a mere 19’4 ½” long. The official color on this beautiful Cadillac is Sierre-Rose, with Eldorado trim and a gorgeous interior in lilac and white deep tucked leather. She sports W/W on those super Caddy wire wheels on all four corners. This is a fairly new ride for Brad and we look forward for you to see it in person at the 60th Portland Roadster show come March 18-20, 2016 at the Portland Expo Center.

SEMA 2015

sema-2015

SEMA2015 has outdone itself again. The SEMA Show has grown throughout the years—along with it, the Convention Center down in Las Vegas has expanded as well, out of necessity. Because, this year’s show utilized every square inch available. Additional displays filled the Sands Convention Center and areas of the Westmark Hotel. This show is one of the largest in Vegas. Many were complaining of walking the over thirty miles of aisles – but, not yours truly!

We heard Linda Vaughn was in the house but never found her. Her good friend George Barris, builder of who knows how many way out, Hollywood hot rods, died before the show ended. Godspeed—He will be missed by many.

Every year this show set the pace for what we will be seeing in the coming years in the Hot Rod world. There is plenty to talk about but for now, we have a few observations. As usual the number of bitchin’, badass, brand new hot rods was in the thousands. Nowhere on earth will you see this many brand new builds. We were covering them as fast as we could for #GearHeadsWorld. Check it out online in the coming weeks to view the most extensive video collection of the event.

To start off, one thing we were not seeing was a proliferation of roots style superchargers, along with the muscle car style pro Streeters’ we used to see. Now, the Pro Touring style is more the order of the day. The Prochargers’ and the turbos are more hidden down in the engine compartment.

Something we are seeing a lot of is carbon fiber all over some of the cars. Some cars are completely made of carbon fiber. Some of the builders are getting into making molds for this. There were many custom, carbon touches made for good eyeball candy.

Continuing on that subject was the proliferation of body wraps. Dozens and dozens of companies have sprung up that can wrap your car from head to toe with a brand new paint job, without painting it. It’s all decals GearHeads!
But when it comes to actually painting your hot rod, this is what we found: Flatz paint is in.  Make no mistake about it. These kinds of paint jobs are tough to do but it looks like they are here to stay for a good, long time. We were seeing them on all kinds of vehicles. And the color selection was nothing short of amazing. All kinds of bright colorful variations of flat paint.  Be ready – it is coming to your neighborhood soon.

One final observation would have to include the wheels. With all of the new cad/cam and billet machining capabilities that are available nowadays, wheel styles have exploded.  Be ready for the largest selection of wheels ever! ‘Nuff said.

Jon Maninila’s 1968 GTO

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Photos by John Jackson of NotStockPhotography

The beauty you see gracing these pages was built by MetalWorks Classic Auto Restoration in Eugene, Oregon as their personal “shop car.” Not a bad shop vehicle huh? Before shop owner Jon Mannila and the talented crew at MetalWorks got their hands on the 68, it was an illegal daily driver… ha ha, but we’ll get into that in a bit.

The first recorded history of the GTO dates back to the early 80s when Rick, a customer of MetalWorks, purchased it for $2500. After about 3 years of ownership Rick had a blue velour interior installed in the Pontiac, as at the time blue velour was extremely cool, and it matched the GTO’s blue and white exterior. Rick’s wife became the primary driver of the 68 and would take their two children to visit Rick at the video arcade that he owned and operated (note video arcades were also very popular at the same time that blue velour was considered cool). The only problem with Rick’s wife driving herself and their children the 7 miles from Canyonville to Riddle, Oregon was that she has never gotten a driver’s license. Oh well, that’s what back roads are for.

The GTO was sold to a guy, then to another guy, until Rick lost contact with it. Then one day, Rick heard of a GTO for sale in the area, so he went and checked it out. Rick positively identified the 68 as being his old car by, you guessed it, the blue velour interior. As fate would have it with the GTO back in Rick’s posession, very little happened with it. After some time of collecting dust, Rick convinced Jon Manilla that he needed another GTO, as he knew Jon had one GTO already, and as we all know, cars are like potato chips—you can’t have just one. So a deal was struck and Jon became the owner of a 2nd GTO. Jon had just finished the restoration of his first GTO in a stock manner, and was discovering that stock was just not his style. So, with a blank canvas in front of him Jon decided to build his new 68 in more of a hot rod /pro-touring fashion with the thought that the GTO would become a promo piece for the shop. This new direction would also allow MetalWorks to build a car the way they wanted to build one, and to show people what is possible.

An Art Morrison chassis and a new GM Performance LS1 were ordered through MetalWorks’ own “in house” Speed Shop, but soon the build began to snowball as many builds tend to. The LS1 was used as a mock up engine, but a custom build LS3 by Wegner Motorsports had already been ordered running a stage 2 cam, and pushing nearly 600 hp. Then, before the LS3 was nestled inside the rails of the Morrison chassis it was topped with an MSD Atomic LS fuel injection system and coils. Initial thoughts of an automatic were replaced with a TREMEC 6 speed manual that is linked to a Ford 9” with a 4.10 Trutrac posi rear end hosting 31 spline axles. With all “go” the GTO needed some serious “whoa,” so 14” Wilwood vented rotors with 6 & 4 piston calipers were ordered. A couple wheel and tire combinations were scratched until Jon found the perfect combo in a set of Budnik “Platnium” series. Thoughts of autocross racing resulted in a Ridetech TIGER cage for an A-body being ordered, then, modifications were performed to work with the Art Morrison chassis. Ridetech 5 point harness seatbelts were also installed to keep driver and passenger secure in the corners.

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While the crew was hard at work on the chassis and drive line, the body was striped, then sent to MetalWorks acid dipping  facility. Once the body was at ground zero in bare metal the guys in the body shop got busy massaging the body to perfection, then they applied several coats of “MetalWorks Red” paint. The final step was to wet sand and buff the body to mirrored perfection.  Once the body was ready it was sat on the chassis, and the assembly process began.  The hidden headlights were converted from vacuum to electric to do anyway with any more “lazy eyed” driving.  The factory gauges were replaced with OEM styled Dakota Digital replacements, as well as an electronic climate controller from DD.  An Alpine head unit controls 2000 watts worth of stereo that are masterfully hidden throughout the GTO’s interior.  Speaking of interiors, sadly the blue velour was past its prime and had to be replaced with a custom OEM styled leather interior that was stitched together by Jon Lind Interiors.

When all the dust had settled the crew at MetalWorks had created one wild pro-touring GTO. A comment often heard by admirers is that they have never seen a GTO taken to this level.  Another common statement is that it is nice to see a less common GM model get the royal treatment, instead of yet another camaro.  The GTO is definitely not just for customers to admire from a distance at the shop.  If a customer is looking to have a high end pro-touring car built, or is curious about an LS conversion, Jon will take them out for a white knuckle rip in the 68, which tends to leave customers in a state of perma-grin and reaching for their wallets with still shaking hands.

Above and beyond being an excellent promotion and sales tool, the GTO is a point of pride for the talented crew at MetalWorks who built it.  If you spot this red hot 68 cruising the streets of the Pacific Northwest, don’t be afraid to flag them down as you will meet some of the most down to earth and talented builders in the industry…but if you’re looking to race, you may find yourself admiring the GTO’s freshly restored taillights!!!