Feature Car of the Month

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This sweet and clean looking little 1941 Ford Fordor Sedan has quite a history.

The Ford Motor Company assembly line that she came off from has an even greater history to behold. For those of you that are 75 years of age or older will remember that it was in that year the US officially entered into  World War Two. Ford geared up to start producing B-24 Liberator Bombers for the Army Air-Corp and built 8,685 averaging 18 per day. They also produced 1500 4-Wheel drive recon vehicles (Jeeps), plus 300 mobile field kitchens for the Army. Ford also produced synthetic oil from soy beans at one of their midwest plants. While all of that was going on they still had time and man-power to produce 25,928 Deluxe Fordor Sedan Automobiles plus 3,838 Special Fordor Sedans of which 1800 were delivered to become Military Staff Cars. Total Mfg cost back in 1941 $512, MSRP $815. A note of interest: Ford Motor Company achieved in April of 1941 its 29 Millionth car to come off from their assembly lines in the history of the company. We at R&R NW Publications in recognition to the time, date and history of Calvin and Joann Graham’s 1941 Ford Deluxe Fordor Sedan, are honored to make this Burgundy metallic Pearl colored beauty, with a hint of ghost flames, our Featured Car of the Month for May 2016.

This delicious Burgandy ’41 Ford Sedan sports a tweeked 302 ci Ford for power w/ C4 auto tranny 8.5” Posi Rear. Mix and match Ford and GM parts make up the Front suspension w/Disc brakes on all four corners. She sports a clean and neat fabric interior with electronic gauges on the custom wood dash and plenty of room for the whole family to enjoy this ride in style.

Cal graduated from Bell High in the L.A. area back in 1966 and immediately entered California State College in Fullerton. His college days were interrupted when the US Army was looking for a few good men back in 1967 and away went Cal to do a two year program in the Army. His military requirement completed, he returned to Cal. State, and got his degree in Structural Engineering. The first company he went to work for, in the L.A. area, he met a beautiful young lady that, had just moved to California from New York, and the rest is history. Cal and Joann recently celebrated their forty-third Wedding Anniversary. They now have four fantastic grown children and four wonderful grandchildren and life has been good to them. They relocated from sunny California to Oregon back in the early eighty’s and settled in the Hillsboro area. Cal is an active member of the Pharaohs Street Rodders in good standing and donates a lot of time to their Pharaohs Endless Summer Cruise-In at Billy Bobs in Gresham every Wednesday after-noon in beautiful downtown Gresham. Cal reminded me to let everyone know they are all welcome and invited from 4:00 pm to 7:30pm, fair weather permitting. Open to all classes of Classic Vintage Stock and or Custom Cars, Street Rods, Bikes and Trucks from June to September. Great Food, Fantastic Automobiles, Super Music, and Games for all ages plus Winning Car Trophies supplied and sponsored by The Pharaohs Street Rodders.

We at R&R NW Publication would like to thank Cal and all of his fellow Veterans for giving us your time and service to protecting this great nation. We would also like to thank and recognize the Pharaohs Street Rodders for their continued support to the Veterans. The MIAP and the Lines for Life programs with their history of thousands of dollars donated to these two causes every year. We are proud and honored to make Cal and Joann’s 1941 Ford Deluxe Fordor/Revised Military Staff Vehicle, our Featured Car of the Month for May 2016.

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Woulda! Coulda! Shoulda!

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Let’s start this little story by offering you the same deal that I was offered back in 1963.

Now this deal woulda, in hindsight, made me a lot of extra bucks. If only I coulda taken that big chance and had faith in the individuals that offered me something for almost nothing. I shoulda jumped at the chance, but; I was reminded by more than one individual, that more times than not, you end up getting nothing in return for the same amount of almost nothing invested.

As I stated above the year was about 1963 and I had just returned to Spokane, Washington from some time in the US Coast Guard. I retrieved my ’26 Ford Model “T” Coupe from storage. She looked pretty good. I had the rusted out rear trunk lid and lower panel replaced by a fellow with the name Mr. Tiny Larson. I’m not sure why they called him “Tiny” as he probably hit the scales at over 400 pounds, but he did a great job on the repair work and touch up paint. All she needed now was to be cleaned up and a little detail work, the battery charged, and some fresh petrol in the gas tank.

I started a new job at Fiber-Form Boat manufacturing and they put me in the model making department. These were all-fiberglass boats that looked pretty sporty and came in several models and sizes. The guy in charge was a fella by the name of Bill Bongers and we had some things in common—he loved custom cars and street rods with the same flair as I, with one exception, and that was that he could afford them.

He had a world class 1955 Chevy Convertible that Sam and George Barris down in Southern California did a custom trick on. She sported Packard tail lights in the extended rear fenders, custom grille, frenched head lights, and a sporty California Kit spare tire out back. She was painted a powder blue color and carried the name of “my blue heaven.” She was picked by Bill Peterson, the owner of Hot-Rod Magazine, as one of his top 100 custom cars of all time.

Did I mention that Mr. Bongers also had a 1932 Ford Victoria? Another world class tricked out street rod painted the same powder blue. At car shows he displayed them side by side. They won trophies in custom car shows all over the west coast wherever they appeared.

Well, this story gets some added attention as Bill Bongers mentioned to the Barris brothers that he had an employee that was driving a cherry little all-steel ’26 Tall “T” Coupe. They in turn just happen to know a guy in the Portland area that was making fiberglass replacement parts for Ford model “T”s, “A”s and “B”s and they knew he was looking for a ’26 or ’27 “T” to make plugs for producing fiberglass fenders and other body parts. Could they give him my name and number?

The Fiberglass parts guy from Portland was none other than Mr. Dee Westcott. As it turned out Mr. Dee Westcott made a trip to eastern Washington in the fall of “63 and visited Fiber-Form Boat factory and sure enough Mr. Bongers turns Dee on to my “T” Coupe. I think Mr. Wescott liked the look of my “T” and had probably already envisioned in his mind, pulling my car apart to start making front and rear, right and left fiberglass fenders as fast as they could get a plug mold made off from my “T”s cherry all steel fenders. Next would be the hood and the rear deck lids as they too were pretty cherry and probably in demand in the parts department down there in the Portland area.

Mr. Wescott, as I remember, treated me with a lot of respect and was a quality understanding guy. At that time in my life the Model “T” was my only means of transportation and was truly my bread and butter existence ride to work every day. Letting it go off to Oregon for Mr. Wescott to take her all apart and make mold plugs from her parts just wasn’t something that I could realistically think of doing. The idea of getting a fresh new paint job on her was an inviting offer but it just wasn’t the right time in my life to let the “T” go to Oregon on the back of a semi flatbed truck not knowing if I would ever see her again and if I did, would she be in 50 pieces and undriveable. Woulda, Coulda Shoulda, but didn’t!

In hindsight after getting to know the Wescott family and the roll that the Wescott fiberglass car parts has played in the history of the street rod community I would give Dee Wescott not only my Model”T,” but I would give my right arm just to have an opportunity to let him know how much we all loved him and everything he stood for. From his strong ethical business history to his charitable giving to the local community, the involvement with the local fire department, the Damascus city government and to his love and contribution to the forming of the Multnomah Hot Rod Council and the Portland Roadster Show. Dee is also the gentleman businessman that made the down payment on an old used airstrip down in Woodburn, Oregon that became the Woodburn Dragstrip. This helped get our young people from racing on the local highways around Portland, which in turn, saved lives and a lot of broken dreams.

Dee will always be one of those shining lights that only come along a few times in a person’s life. We thank the whole Wescott Family for sharing your wonderful Dee with all of us that had the honor of knowing him in his precious life. His memory truly lives on every time you see or hear that another Wescott creative work of automobile artistic wonder has won another trophy in the world of Custom Classic Cars and Street Rods. This is my Woulda, Coulda, Shoulda picture of events, in the life of my 90 year old Model”T” that actually happened back in the month of September in 1963. From Colliedog BC.

Mecum Auctions

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Mecum Now Accepting Consignments for Inaugural Portland Collector Car Auction; 600 Muscle Cars, Classics, Hot Rods and More to be Auctioned June 17-18 at Portland Expo Center

Walworth, Wis. – Feb. 10, 2016—Vehicle consignment for Mecum Auctions’ inaugural Portland classic and collector car auction begins today, approximately four months in advance of the June 17-18 arrival of the estimated 600-vehicle lineup at the Portland Expo Center in Portland, Ore. American muscle cars, classics, Corvettes, Hot Rods, Resto Mods and more are all expected to cross the auction block from an estimated 20 surrounding states and Canada.

“We are happy to bring Mecum Auctions to Portland and to support the rich collector car heritage in the area,” comments Dana Mecum, the President and Founder of Mecum Auctions. “Events such as the Portland Roadster Show and the Portland Automotive Swap Meet that have longstanding traditions of more than 50 years are evidence of the passion, dedication, and grassroots history of collector car enthusiasts in the area.”
“The people of the Pacific Northwest are passionate about cars and the history associated with the industry as reflected in local attractions like Portland’s World of Speed Museum,” said Jeff Miller, president and CEO, Travel Portland. “We are thrilled to have the Mecum auction coming to Portland for the first time and look forward to introducing visiting sellers, buyers and general consumers from throughout the region to all that Portland has to offer.”

The Portland auction is open to sellers, buyers, and spectators. Persons interested in consigning a vehicle to be auctioned at the Mecum Portland auction should visit Mecum.com or call (262) 275-5050 for complete details about the consignment process and pricing. Mecum Auction’s website is updated daily with the latest consignments including detailed descriptions and photographs of the vehicles.

Bidder registration is $100 in advance and $200 at the auction and includes admission for two for both auction days. To view the list of consigned vehicles when available, or to register as a bidder for this and all Mecum auctions, visit www.mecum.com or call (262) 275-5050. General admission tickets available at the gate for $30 per person per day or $40 for a two-day pass; children 12 and younger receive complimentary admission.
Doors open each day at 8 a.m. with the auction beginning with Road Art at 8:30 a.m. and the cars at 10 a.m. NBC Sports Network will broadcast a select schedule of auction coverage, and a live stream of the entire auction will be presented at Mecum.com.

About Mecum Auctions
Nobody sells more than Mecum. Nobody. The Mecum Auction Company is the world leader of collector car, vintage and antique motorcycle, and Road Art sales, hosting auctions throughout the United States. The company has been specializing in the sale of collector cars for 29 years, now offering more than 20,000 lots per year and averaging more than one auction each month. Established by President Dana Mecum in 1988, Mecum Auctions remains a family-run company headquartered in Walworth, Wis. For further information, visit Mecum.com or call (262) 275-5050. Follow along with Mecum’s social media news and join us on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and Instagram.

Schedule:
Portland Expo Center
2060 N. Marine Dr.
Portland, OR 97217
June 17-18, 2016
Admission: $30 per person, per day or $40 for two days; children 12 and younger
receive complimentary admission
Preview: Gates open daily at 8 a.m.
Auction: Vehicles start at 10 a.m. with Road Art beginning at 8:30 a.m.
TV Schedule: TBD

(All times Pacific)

Silver Auctions

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Silver Auctions came to Portland In April with a complement of 94 cars consigned to be sold at their auction.

This one day auction brought some very unique and nice cars to the EXPO Center. Mitch Silver said vehicles offered were sold or were high bid to a total dollar figure of $1,561,000. A respectable figure. They managed a 43% sell through when the dust was settled.

There were a lot of really cool cars. One beautiful Dodge Coronet bid to $70,000 but didn’t sell. Yes, it had a HEMI. I think I’ve seen rare cars like this sell for bigger bucks so no wonder the reserve wasn’t met. Speaking of rare cars. There was a 1970 Chevrolet Monte Carlo, SS454/AT/AC car, well equipped and nice looking. It too didn’t meet the reserve with a high bid of $13,000. I don’t know what the reserves were but either of these two cars are good examples of what was available. Personally, I love to own either of them.

The next Silver Auction will be in Missoula, Montana on May 7th. Find out more @ www.silverauctions.com or call 1-800-255-4485 to learn more.


Recipe for Failure

Joe-Salvadore


This season’s broadcast of the Daytona races were accompanied by a documentary called “Untold Stories: Daytona.”

Contained within were excellent profiles of Mario Andretti and Sterlin Marlin but of greater interest to me were segments on Smokey Yunick and the Aero Wars of the late sixties.

Yunick, the film established, was not a cheater but a great innovator. It was for the free thinkers like him that the rules were written. In the story about the cars themselves, the ways in which NASCAR influenced the auto makers (and vice versa) were discussed. It was an exciting time of growth for the series, to be sure but competition-wise, it wasn’t that great. When one team has a distinct advantage over the others, the racing isn’t close and there are few surprises.

Today people complain about restrictor plate racing and “cookie cutter race cars” but in reality, the competition is closer than ever. Now everyone has virtually identical equipment so advantages must gained in other ways like pit strategies.

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Many enjoy romanticizing about the “Run watcha brung days” but truthfully, a lack of rules rarely results in close racing. Left unattended, “open competition” type racing in destined to fail. Let me give you a good example: Some of the races I attended as a teenager were foreign stock car events on a dirt road course. It was basically entry level racing and there was a separate class for the guys that wanted the freedom to hot rod their cars more. This class mostly consisted of VW bugs with over-sized racing tires and pumped up engines. By the time I started racing myself, the “Super Sedans” as they were called, were already in trouble. They had moved from the road course to the 3/8th mile oval and sprouted sprint car style wings. They were fast but that speed came at a hefty price. By the mid-eighties the division was down to a half dozen regular competitors. The class of the field was a Karmann Ghia with an alcohol injected, turbo charged engine. Mounted high above the motor was a long megaphone exhaust pipe that generally trailed about three feet of blue flame! Pretty spectacular.  A cool race car… as they all were, but expensive to keep running.

Gary Dillard had raced Super Sedans in the early seventies and had moved up to V-8 powered sprint car style Super Modifieds. When he crashed his Super, he pulled all the components out of his damaged chassis and hung them in his new Super Sedan. This car was significantly lighter than the Volkswagens thanks to a tube frame and a formed aluminum body. For power Dillard turned to a talented local builder named Mark Rohrman who built him an exotic V-4. It was literally half of a fuel injected small block Chevrolet, still displacing three liters. Interestingly, when Dillard got it wound up, it thundered just like it had all eight cylinders. The car debuted on May 3rd 1985 and promptly swept the program. When the V-4 returned a week later, Dillard captured his Heat and the Trophy Dash but broke in the Feature. And that was the way his season went.  When the car stayed together, it destroyed the competition. It competed in nine  of the twelve programs that year. It won six Features and broke down in the other three. It was truly a magnificent racecar. It was legal because essentially, there were no rules. I think most everyone appreciated what Dillard and Rohrman had created… except those who had to race against it. The VW guys got together and the V-4 was banned for 1986.They were back to racing each other (just the six of them on a good night) for the next couple of seasons.

When the racetrack closed in 1988, all of the participating classes were invited to follow the Race Director to different venue within a couple hours’ tow—Everyone except the Super Sedans.

Sadly, for them the final checkered flag had fallen.

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2016 Medford Roadster Show

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February and March appear to be “Car Show” months, at least here in the Northwest.

With the Salem Roadster Show in February and the 60th Annual Portland Roadster Show in March. The first one though was a little ways down the road in mid-February in Medford Oregon.

Rich Wilson of Central Point, Oregon is the promoter for the first time this year and it really turned out to be a great show. Even though this is Rich first Medford Roadster Show, I think he has done this before and folks he is good at it.

The show was spread out through three or four buildings at the Jackson County Expo Center with lots of vendors and separate displays of other than “show cars,” like Rat Rods and stock restorations.  There were hot rods and street machines in the main building, which has two levels, the main floor and a mezzanine like level, which gives you an overview look at the mail floor. Different and it worked.

They advertised a $1000.00 Cash Prize for Best of Show and gave a percentage of the profits to Charity.

Rich did something that I’ve never seen before and what a great idea. If you’ve ever entered your car in a show before you know you get pretty tired what with the set up and polishing and dusting and in general just hanging around once all that work is done. Well Rich created a little “Participants Lounge” if you will that was equipped with easy chairs, sofas, tables and chairs etc. and it was stocked with food and beverage and volunteer help where one could go take a break and get a bite to eat, and it was all included. Yep no charge.  The food was terrific too. Spaghetti for one meal. Coffee and donuts in the morning, enchiladas for another lunch. Like I said I’ve never seen that before but it was a great idea and much appreciated by all who participated.
Put the 2016 Medford Roadster Show on your list for next year, it’s a good show.

Saluting the 2016 Salem Roadster Show

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Show promoters Bob Symons and Greg Roach are to be congratulated for yet another super fantastic collection of Classic and Custom Cars, Trucks and Bikes at the tenth annual Salem Roadster Show.

The celebration took place on February 20th and 21st at the Americraft Center on the grounds of the Oregon State Fair in beautiful Salem, Oregon.  In nineteen hours the two day show entertained well over 5,000 car enthusiast to 115 winning custom show cars, classic original cars, trucks and bikes.  The one thing each of these gorgeous automobiles, trucks and bikes had in common was, each had previously been big winners at other car shows and cruz-ins all over the West Coast from B.C. Canada to San Diego, California.  Bob and Greg’s invitations only go out to the best of the best in the trophy winning category.  This show was no exception.  Every entry shined with class, and was high-lighted by over 125 special custom made Salem Roadster Show Jackets awarded one to each entry for their winning appearance in the show.

In the past ten years this show has attracted almost 60,000 custom car and truck enthusiast to witness over 1200 classic custom cars, trucks and bikes.  A note of interest over 1200 custom tailor made Salem Roadster Show jackets have also been awarded to all of the entry’s and in Bob and Greg’s eyes you’re all winners.  Wear your winning jackets with pride.

In addition these past ten years the Salem Roadster Show has supported a host of local and regional charities.  Doernbecher Children’s Hospital Cancer Program through KDCCP, The Al Kader Shriners Hospital, Brent Strohmeyer Scholarship Foundation and the Roberts Charter High School Foundation with tens of thousands of dollars, from the proceeds of the shows, dedicated to these charities.
A few selected custom car stars at the 10th Salem Roadster Show 2016.

Early Bird Swap Meet

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We ascertained before that there are a lot of car people out there and despite the Northwest reputation for rain, (I know I’m shocked too) there is actually a lot going on even during the winter. Swap meets seem to be happening all over the area and yes it has been raining some but the spirits of the participants and the people who attended didn’t seem to be dampened much.

The Early Bird Swap Meet in Puyallup turned out to be quite a good swap meet, with lots of great deals on what could have been your next project and or parts for your current one.

Did it rain?  Yes but not a lot and a great deal of it was inside or at least undercover.  Put this one on your list for next year.


Feature Car of the Month

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Growing up in southern California back in the mid-forties, Max Panetta built his first automobile at age fifteen. 

Of course he was living at the center of the birth of custom cars, street rods, trucks and bikes in the L.A. area of sunny California.
Max’s is credited with having his signature on 75–80 vehicle titles in the past 70 plus years. What’s amazing is that 20–25 of those wild automobiles he designed, developed and totally built himself. One hundred per cent from ground up, start to finish. We at R&R NW publication have shared with our readers six of his fantastic creations in past editions. Now it’s our pleasure to share  another sweet little ride from Max’s collection. His latest is a 1936 Ford Roadster street rod.

A quick note of importance: Max did not build this old school vintage ’36, as it was skillfully created here in the Portland area several years ago. Max would like to give a thumbs up to all the people that had a hand in putting it together as she is a true work of art. Max has made a few updated improvements on her like a new electric fuel line system, a rebuilt rear-end, plus he added power steering to get down the highway with a little more ease.

You all remember of course the difference between a convertible and a roadster. Well for those of you that may not, the roadster is the one they built at the Ford factory without any roll-up windows. Thus you end up with a sleek, cool looking, fare weather ride with a little fresh air hitting you in the face for 365 days a year.

This sweet little 1936 old school Ford roadster, complete with a soft fabric one piece top, runs a 350 Chevy for power, 350 tranny and an 8” Ford rear-end, plus power brakes on all four corners. She’s running 550 x15” up front and 850×15” out back creating that perfect stance.

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This delicious Gibbons body came complete with 2 ½” chopped top She sports a beautiful leather rumble seat at the rear and a matching all-leather old school interior with electronic gauges. The body is finished in Sea-Foam Green with pearlized mint green flames and pearlized ghost flames escaping across the hood. She’s a creative work of artistic automotive beauty.

After completing a tour in the US Navy, Max joined the Northrop Aviation group in Southern Ca. as a Senior Electronics Engineer. His career took him all over the world to over 30 different countries. He finally retired in 1991 and relocated to the Portland area.

At last count he’s got insurance coverage on five automobiles, two trucks, two car hauling trailers, and two small tractors. Both of these exciting little-man tractors were built 100% by hand in Max’s own shop. They have been enjoyed by all for the past several years down at the annual tractor pull and show at the Power Land and Tractor Museum in Brooks, Oregon. Max is an active member of the Kool Guys Hot Rod Breakfast at the Hangar Restaurant, meeting every friday morning around 7 am in Carver, Oregon.

We at R&R NW Publication would like to thank you Mr. Panetta for your dedicated time in the US Armed Forces and for your time well served as a Senior Electronics Engineer and your creative contribution to the Space Age Industry. We are proud and honored to select your 1936 Ford Roadster as our featured car of the Month for April 2016.

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Ron Braxling’s LAS Powered ’72 Chevy Truck

1972-Chevy-MetalWorks

Most of us have a classic car that we have dreamed of owning, but due to circumstances the opportunity has never presented itself.

With luck and time many dreams can become reality if we are patient enough—such was the case with Ron Braxling, and his dream of owning a 1972 Chevy Cheyenne 20 Super truck.

Ron had always been drawn to ’72 Chevy trucks. There was just something about the body style and trim packages of the Cheyenne 20 Supers; but with a busy life raising a family, and running a business, Ron put aside his dream truck until the timing was finally right.

Like many modern car shoppers Ron began hunting online for a truck, and a shop to restore a potential project. A truck was located first, a very nice example of a ’72 Cheyenne in fact. Ron continued his search for a shop to build the truck into his vision, and came across MetalWorks Classic Auto Restoration in Eugene, Oregon. Ron and owner Jon hit it off right away, and shared a common vision for a truck build, except for one problem—Ron had purchased too nice of a truck… ha ha.

Now, you might be wondering how that is possible, but the reasoning was that Ron had some pretty cool upgrades in mind for his dream build, and it would be a shame to alter the original truck he had purchased. Ironically Jon had just purchased an extremely nice, but ultra plane Jane ’72 2WD C10 truck, and in the end it was concluded that it would be best to leave Ron’s initial truck purchase unaltered and instead build the C10.

The team at MetalWorks got busy and within a day the C10 was blown apart and sent off to MetalWorks acid dipping facility. What came back from dipping was a perfect ground zero starting point as the C10’s body was solid, and straight.
As I mentioned Ron had some cool upgrades in mind for his dream truck and the crown jewel came in the form of a 556 hp supercharged LSA engine backed by a 4L85E trans. MetalWorks spent the next 9 months transforming the 2WD C10 into a custom version of a 4WD Cheyenne 20 Super. The only external mods are a 6” lift with custom wheels and tires.

Inside the 72 we find an OEM styled leather interior, Dakota Digital gauges, power sliding rear window, and a host of well hidden stereo components.

As amazing as the ’72 appears externally, what is hiding under the hood is what always creates wide eyed stares of disbelief whenever Ron lifts the hood—like the opening of a gold filled treasure chest.

In the end Ron got his dream truck. One well worth the wait until the timing was right in his life. So what does one do with a gorgeous 4×4 truck packing 556 hp? The possibilities are endless, some would say hit the local mud hole, while others cringe at the thought of the truck even seeing rain. Only Ron truly knows the truck’s future, but if you spot this beauty rolling down the highways and byways of the Pacific Northwest, feel free to give Ron a thumbs up. He’ll be the guy behind the wheel with a smile on his face.

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