What’s It?

Well, how exciting.  The number of calls, emails, letters and more that we received with regard to the “What’s It,” pictures we published, showed that you readers had some interest in this little “mini feature.”

The December car didn’t get much in terms of any info regarding it, aside from a few comments in passing like, “I think I’ve seen that car, but I can’t remember where.”  Or, “That car looks familiar.”  Some discussion about it looking like an individually styled “custom” came from many readers but nothing definitive as to what it is, who might have built it, does it still exist or where it might be now.

The little gray “What’s It” in January, however; did indeed spark a lot of interest and “guesses” as to what it might be, including several who believe it is a Crosley Farm-O-Road, a Crofton Bug, a King Midget and one fellow from El Salvador who said it looked like  a car built there, not for export, called a “Cherito.”  Several individuals said that it was a “Proto-type” utility type vehicle built for a very important and specific use, at the Freightliner factory in Portland back in the 70’s.  The body is aluminum, the chassis appears to be a Crosley, but there are no name plates, serial plates etc. to be found on the car that would identify its origin or brand.  The lack of any manufacturer IDs and the multiple claims of recognition gives me reason to believe that last identity might be correct.

The Crosley Farm-O-Road was built in the early 50’s.  The Crofton Bug was an updated version of the Farm-O-Road re-branded and built by Crofton Marine Engineering from 1959 through 1963. The Crosley engine was built by several manufacturers until sometime in the early 70’s, about the time some say this Proto-type was built by some of the crew at Freightliner.  The similarities between the Crosley, the Crofton and this car are obvious but different in that the hood top is flush with the fender tops on the What’s It, but they aren’t on either the Crosley or the Crofton.  The top itself doesn’t match anything I’ve found made by either manufacturers, but it does look like a Freightliner top.  I’m going to talk with the current owner to see what else he might know about it and I’m going to go a little farther on this “What’s It” by contacting the Crosley Automobile Club to get their input in an effort to definitively identify this unique car.  I encourage any of you who might know something about it to contact me too.

That “very important and specific use” mentioned above? The Friday beer run of course. I’ve been told (unconfirmed and unverified) the little car was used for picking up cases of beer at the local convenience store on Fridays. This is just hearsay of course.

All for the Love of Horseless Carriages & Authentic Classic Automobiles

1906 Cadillac Tulip Touring

Jerome W. “Jerry” Hubert born into this world on December 27, 1923. He turned out to be more than just a Christmas gift to his Dad and Mom and his four siblings back in Amery, Wisconsin.

He has become a gift to every person that loves classic, beautiful creations of automobile wonder. We at R&R Northwest Publications are proud to bring you seven of Jerry’s completed artistic creations with an additional sneak preview update on three more works in progress.

1912 Ford Model “T” Touring
Started 1956 Four Year Restoration
Capacity: 4 Adults, 4 CYL power plant, 20 HP, 2 speed transmission on the floor, 10 gal. gas tank, 30”x 3” T&W up front and 30”x 3 ½” on the rear, Carbide Gas Generator mounted on running board, brass side lamps and tail lights on kerosene oil, Carbide Gas fed brass headlamps, 45 to 50 MPH top speed, deep diamond tucked black leather upholstery, dark blue color with white striping and black fenders. The brass side lamps, brass horn, brass step pads and Cars Top were accessory items back in 1912 and priced accordingly. This award winning Model ”T” has been featured in two movies and on national TV on several occasions. Winner of the prestigious “LaBarre Trophy” and many more.

1911 Ford Model “T” Open Touring

Four to Five Year Restoration
Capacity: 4 Adults, all stock 4 CYL, 20 HP, 2 speed tranny, 30” x 3” Ash Spoke wheels upfront and 30”x 3 ½” on the rear, 45 to 50 MPH, shipped and priced like 1912 with brass radiator and front brass windshield frame with glass, came as standard equipment – all other extra items were priced as accessories. Beautiful bright red color on body with white striping, black hood and black fenders with deep diamond tucked black leather interior. 100% authentically built to detail.

1925 Ford Model “T” Roadster
Four Year Restoration
Capacity: 2 Adults, all stock 4 CYL, 20 HP, 2 speed tranny, 45 to 50 MPH, shipped with same driving features as 1911 and 1912 “T”s, except this one is black on black with no brass accessories added. A beautiful all black leather interior topped off this gorgeous 1925 “T” Roadster. This is another world class award winner, also receiving the ”LaBarre Trophy” for the patience and perfection to detail by Jerry on all of his artistic auto creations.

1930 Ford Model “A” Deluxe Roadster
with Dual Side Mounts
Capacity: 2+2 Adults, All stock 4 CYL for power, 3 speed trans, wide white walls on all four corners plus two more on the fenders with stock yellow wire spokes for fun. This Model “A” Deluxe came complete with everything on it that Ford offered in 1930. Rumble seat, leather carrying case at rear, chrome step pads, etched side wind windows, deluxe roadster top. Beautiful Candy Blue color with white striping and black fenders. A deluxe red leather interior to match the Rumble Seat. Yes, two adults in the cab and two more in the Rumble Seat for a fun time ride, in this another big fantastic show winner.

1906 Cadillac Tulip Touring
7 to 8 Year Restoration
Capacity: 4 Adults, right hand drive horseless carriage. One horizontal cylinder (5” bore 5” Stroke), chain drive, side start crank, 10 HP, 2 speed transmission with reverse, 20 to 25 MPH. Ten gallon gas tank, 30” x 3 ½” tires and wheels all the way around with red painted Ash Spokes, complete with pin striping. An all steel red painted and pinstriped show chassis, Steel hood and fenders and an all wood body.
The only paint color Cadillac used on these fabulous creations was called “Purple Lake.” It was used on the body only with black for the fenders and trim. Again with straight as an arrow accented pin striping. The interior is done in a deep diamond tucked and rolled rich Cordovan Leather to match the body. Brass Carbide Gas side-mount Generator, brass side lamps, brass headlights and a brass driver’s steering light at hand level. Jerry received the Stanley Wanless Award for his attention to detail and perfection at the Concours d’Elegance in Forest Grove, Oregon, in 1995.
Watch for coming issues of R&R as Jerry is about 95% done with a sister car in a 1906 Cadillac Roadster. Another beautiful artistic creation work in progress.

1912 Rambler Touring
6 to 7 Year Restoration
Capacity: 4 to 5 Adults, 4 CYL for power – est. 35 to 40 HP, 2 speed transmission. 12 volt system with magneto, 55 to 60 MPH, rich nickel plated brass headlamps and side lamps, all fed from an on-board Carbide Gas Reservoir. 36”x 4” white pneumatic rubber tires off set the Wood Spoke Artillery Wheels, with an extra spare on the rear. The interior is a black Cordovan deep diamond tucked leather with the deluxe top. This Rambler Touring comes in at over 15’ in length and has room for the Babies Basket in the rear seat area. Rambler was one of the true quality upscale cars of its time. This award winning car was featured in the filming of A&E’s story on “America’s Castles” at the Pittock Mansion here in Portland. This is another one of Jerry’s phenomenal restorations of automotive creative wonderment and another winner at the Concours d’Elegance in Forest Grove a few years back.

1915 Franklin Air Cooled Touring
4 to 5 year Restoration
Capacity: 4 to 5 Adults, 6 CYL, 40 HP, first air cooled engine in production in USA. 12 volt system, with Dynamo Starter, generator with built in compressor for on board use. 34”x 4” pneumatic tires with Ash Wood Spoke Wheels. This 1915 Franklin was truly a futuristic wonder in design and engineering for its time, with its all aluminum body and the designing of the Air Flow System to cool that power plant. The articulate detail to restoration in every part and piece that is used in Jerry’s cars are 100% to the original specs. The color on this unique creation is labeled “Brewster Green” and she is one big long and wide green machine. You probably won’t see another one like this anytime soon. Jerry is working on another 1925 Franklin Roadster featuring a dual cowling. It appears to be about 20’ long and has about an 8’ long hood. A work in progress.

Another work in progress is a 1909 Brush Roadster, a rare car only made from 1907 to 1911, and it features a 1 CYL (4 ½” bore and 5″ stroke) for power with an all wood frame, wooden axle front and rear and wood body with steel fenders.

Jerry relocated here to the Portland area in 1946 after serving honorably in the US Navy during WWII. He perfected his life-long talent of repairing watches and started H&H Jewelers in the Hollywood District. He met and married his wife Gerry in 1949 and together they raised two fantastic children, a daughter, Lynnette and a son, Kim. Jerry and Gerry are proud grandparents of five, two boys and three girls. Together they are very active in their local church, and Jerry who recently celebrated his 91st birthday, is also a charter member of the Horseless Carriage Club of America, and helped start the Portland Chapter back in 1965. Memberships also include the Rose City Model T Club, The Franklin Club, The Model T Ford Club of America and the Portland Swap Meet Committee. We at R&R NW Publications want to thank you Mr. & Mrs. Hubert for caring and sharing your fantastic story and the thousands of hours and over 60 years of Restorations to immaculate detailed perfection on each and every one of your artistic creative automobile wonders.

Featured Car of the Month

Bill Stephan's 1963 and a half Ford Galaxie 500 XL

1963 ½ Ford Galaxie 500 XL
Owned by Bill Stephan’s from Clackamas, Oregon

This low-mileage Galaxie 500 XL looks delicious in its stock Champagne color and features a gorgeous black diamond tucked interior covering those 500 XL Bucket Seats. She sounds as good as it looks, running a 289 cubic inch power plant with super cool pipes. Speaking of cool, she was spotted at the Kool Guys Hot Rod Friday Morning Breakfast at the HANGAR Sports Bar and Grill in Carver. This might be the only year round 52 weekly no-host Rod Run event going on in the Portland area come Rain or Shine. Everyone is welcome to this no entry or registration Cruz-In, just come as you are and bring your rides. Pick up the latest issue of Roddin’& Racin’ Northwest when you’re there and your ride might just be the next “Featured Car of the Month.”

1963 and a half Ford Galaxie

The LeMay

Fred's Car at The LeMay

Winter time is a perfect time for a museum trip. In the shadow of the Tacoma Dome, a mere thirty minute drive south of Seattle, lies the LeMay – America’s Car Museum.

If you’re thinking “stodgy”, you probably haven’t been to a museum (any modern museum) in a while. See, they don’t make ‘em like they used to. At some point somebody realized that a bunch of exhibits of anything surrounded by velvet ropes to keep the observer at arm’s length, gets old fast. Hey, if it’s cool we want to get a closer look, right? Anymore, most modern museums encourage you to get closer. In fact, many exhibits these days are actually “hands on.” It’s what they’re calling: interactive. And believe you me, this approach has changed the entire experience. Going to the museum today is much more fun and interesting than it used to be.

The LeMay is a great example of a modern museum having opened in June of 2012. You have four floors to explore with as many as 350 vehicles on display at any given time. There is literally something for everyone in this collection, including the kids. Many of the vehicles belong to the museum but there are also cars on loan for a limited engagement. There are also numerous theme displays like: Masters of Mustang, Legends of Motorsports – The NASCAR Story, Route 66 and the British Invasion. And speaking of hands on, there are even racing simulators and a slot car track! (Extra fee for these)

Cost of admission is $16 for adults with various discounts available depending on your age, whether or not you served in the military, etc. And if you read this paper, you’re very likely to be spending the better part of the day there so it’s worth every penny! Doors are open at 10:00 am and close at 5 pm, seven days a week. For more information: (253) 779-8490.

LeMay

Needing a Car Show/Cruise-in Fix

Cutsforth Cruise Canby 2014 019

Here were are in the middle of January 2015, it seems like decades since the last Cruise-in/Car Show. I know it hasn’t been but I’m just sayin’. So I thought we should put a little picture story together from some happenings from last season. I know it’s not the same but it’s maybe the best I can do at this point. It’s been a while but I know you all remember the shiny orb that greets your skyward glance during the day, even if we haven’t seen much of it for what seems like a really long time. But remember the warmth you’ve felt from it? The sunburn you’ve gotten if you spent too much time out in it, which I strongly recommend not doing! I say strongly because I have and now I’m learning all about why it’s said that you should wear sunblock, don’t get too much sun, wear a hat and so on, but that’s another story. Suffice to say, mind your mother, she actually does know a lot.
Here are some pics from Cutsforth’s Cruise in Canby, Cruisin’ the Gut in Vancouver and the Cruise to Damascus, All from last season. Enjoy.

Quiz Time! What does 17+57+58+77 ad up to?

1957 Pontiac Hardtop

1957 Pontiac Hardtop

If you answered 209 you’re right on the money. I must admit up front, that the older I get, the memory does seem to get a bit cloudier. But as I recall the year was 1958 and I was 17 years old trying to operate a 1957 Pontiac Hardtop when the Washington State Patrol decided I had made a few infractions on the local driving laws.
   

It was December and the eastern Washington snow and ice was starting to pile up. My mother (God Love Her) ran a little restaurant and after school I would offer my assistance as a handy boy helper, kind of a jack of all trades. Like any eating establishment there was always a pile or two of refuse to haul to the local dump. Well I convinced my mother that we could save that $15 per month in garbage collector expenses and I would be in charge of hauling the refuse, alias garbage, to the dump at no expense. Now all I needed was a vehicle to transport it in. We had a nice ¾  ton Dodge truck, but dad certainly had to use that in his daily work and my 1926 Model “T” Tall Coupe didn’t have any room.

So the only thing left was my brother Richard’s 1957 Pontiac Hardtop. Now it was a hard decision for Mom and me to make but as the refuge started piling up we finally decided as long as I was real careful not to spill any of that garbage in the trunk or occasionally in the back seat when room was needed. I promised Mom we would be real careful with brother’s fancy new car and it sure was nice of him to leave it in our trust as he was out wandering the world working a job in Nevada.

As I recall everything was going along fine and about three times a week I would load up the Pontiac and head towards the local dump that  just happened to be located about a mile from our favorite winter ice skating pond. Well it was a little more than a pond it was a place named Liberty Lake. She really froze over big time for several months every winter and probably froze down up to ten feet deep in certain areas, or so I was told. Well as fate would have it I got word that a bunch of the gang, boys and girls, were planning a big ice skating get together complete with bonfire and roast wienies out at the lake on just the same time and day I was planning another garbage run. If I hurried I could haul the refuse then stop by say a quick hello to the ice-skaters and get a free hot dog at the bonfire and still get back to the restaurant in good time. Everything was going as planned until I got to Liberty Lake and the ice pond.  I think more than one of my friends was impressed that I was operating a brand new Pontiac Hardtop in the dead of winter on that snow and ice with some authority. That’s about the time my head got way too big for that little brain of mine, and someone, I think it was my good buddy Larry, suggested why don’t we spin a few doughnuts out on the ice in that fancy high new Pontiac.

Well never being one to back down from a stupid dare, I hopped in that fancy hardtop and headed for the ice pond. Wow ! It was fun out there on the ice spinning those cookies and doughnuts and it even got more exciting when two of the older cheerleaders from Central Valley High jumped in alongside Larry and me and away we went. In my haste to get to the ice I neglected to witness, in plain sight for everyone to see, the sign stating it is against the law to operate a moving vehicle on Liberty Lake when or if ice skaters are performing. Well that’s when old Johnny Law came into the picture, got me for illegally being on the ice doing those cookies / doughnuts and  got me for doing an estimated 77 MPH in 1958 in a 1957 Pontiac Hardtop at 17 years of age. It was a blast and that hot dog was one of the best I ever had.

Oh by the way the fine from Johnny Law was $210. In my haste to tell this story I neglected to mention that before my brother Rich left town he had a little custom work done on the Pontiac. His goal was to do about a $500 lowering job on a $10 budget, so he and his buddies got out the cutting torch and did a number on the coil springs to lower that car down about 3–4”.  

Now everything was looking good until he decided to take it out for a spin and pulled into Ron’s Drive Inn. In doing so he had to pass over a little 2” speed bump. You guessed it, they lowered it so much, that little bump tore both mufflers loose from that Hi-Horse Power V-8 and now he had not only the lowest but also the loudest 57 Pontiac in the Spokane Valley.

He stuck to his budget and did another $10 repair. Instead of replacing the mufflers he added two three foot pieces of tail pipe where the mufflers used to be and created a set of straight pipes that could wake the dead. Now you know why I got that bigger than expected ticket from Washington’s Finest – he got me for that crazy hotrod exhaust. He said when I was out on the ice spinning doughnuts that the noise was so loud it sounded like one of the new F16 fighter jets taking off from Fairchild Air Force Base. It was so loud he thought it might break the glass on his 57 Patty Wagon. That car and myself left some memories, as ten years later at our High School reunion guys were still wondering what ever happened to that garbage hauling 57 Pontiac that left a mark in the ice and got me a big fat ticket at Liberty Lake. All and all it was a great winter to remember back in 1958.

Rhodes to Success

Rhodes-8

“Racing is a selfish sport,” Marco Andretti once quipped. In the last turn, on the last lap, Andretti had just robbed another competitor of a podium finish. He made no apologies…and no truer words were ever spoken.

Conversely, Brad Rhodes may well be the most unselfish racer I’ve ever met. He hosted foster children in his home for over a decade. Today he manages a house occupied by mentally and physically challenged adults. He finds the work rewarding…and oh yeah, did I mention that he is the 2014 Northwest Wingless Tour (NWWT) champion? The path Rhodes took to get to this point in his life was an interesting one…

He was born in North Carolina into a family of loggers. “Dad was my inspiration,” Rhodes says. “He wasn’t a racer but he was a driver.” In his early twenties, the senior Rhodes had nearly been killed in a logging accident. He walked with a profound limp but loved to drive fast. “He was a wild man on the road,” Brad insists. “That was his racing.” Early on, the family pulled up stakes and relocated to Eugene, Oregon where extended family had already settled. Rhodes learned how to drive piloting his father’s hot-rodded truck on their rural property. He even attended the races at Riverside Speedway in Cottage Grove a couple times as a boy. Though he enjoyed the spectacle, he wasn’t smitten…then. Instead it was dirt bikes that captured his fancy.

For about ten years (early nineties to 2003) Rhodes and a buddy hauled their Honda CR500’s back and forth from Eugene to the dunes. A decade of playing in the sand certainly taught him some seat-of-the-pants vehicle control. It was fun but it wasn’t racing.

Then financial hard times struck. Rhodes had trained to be a brick layer but he didn’t have the back for it. He’d switched to electrical about the time the bottom fell out. A contact back in Tennessee suggested that prospects for work might be better back there. Rhodes sold his Honda, his house, everything and moved his young family southeast. It turned out to be a huge mistake. His union training was frowned upon in a non-union market and Rhodes struggled to make ends meet. He supported his family for almost a year on $10 an hour!

A death in the Rhodes family brought him back to the northwest for the services. At that time, Brad took a hard look at what another sibling was doing which was being a foster care provider. Having been foster parents, it didn’t seem like that big of a stretch. Being the compassionate people that they are, it was a relatively easy decision for Brad and his wife to make. They returned to Oregon to pursue their new careers and the rest, as they say, is history.

Once Rhodes and his family were resettled and their financial needs were met, he began to think again in terms of recreation. He’d had a blast with his dirt bike but this time he thought he might like to try his hand at racing. On line he discovered a shop in Portland that rent race cars by the event. Rhodes was thinking a Modified or a Late Model (stock car) but it turned out that the rentals were for road racing vehicles only. Since he had no interest in racing on pavement, that might have been the end of the story but it turned out that the shop owned a Sprint Car as well. The owner of the business suggested that if Rhodes purchased his own Sprinter, they could assist him with that. One trip to Grays Harbor for a NWWT event and Rhodes was convinced.

He purchased an older car that had seen action in another non-wing club. Predictably, when Rhodes prepared to make his Sprint Car debut at Cottage Grove, the old sled refused to fire. His fortunes improved however as the season progressed. Mostly thanks to crew member Chris Petersen (a former champion himself) Rhodes learned how set up, drive, and maintain a Sprint Car. When the final checkered flag fell on 2011, Rhodes stood fifth in overall points. Better yet, he had garnered Rookie of the Year honors.

His stats continued to improve the following season and he finished one position better in points. In 2013 however, Rhodes over extended himself financially and was forced to drop off the tour. In 2014 he was back with a vengeance. By now he had a newer, more competitive chassis, a racing engine assembled by Jeff Rabourn and Petersen solidly in his corner. He had even procured some much needed sponsorship from Pro Tow and Beaverton Automotive. Rhodes commit to the entire series which took the racers to Sunset Speedway in Banks, OR and Coos Bay, as well as Grays Harbor and Cottage Grove. When the dust had settled he had no wins but two podium finishes. That coupled with a perfect attendance record enabled Rhodes to amass the points necessary to clinch the title.

Will he defend that title? “I didn’t set out to win this one,” he laughs. At mid-season he was prepared to let Petersen take over the car for one race but that event rained out. That one night’s point loss probably would have been a game changer. Either way, it doesn’t seem to matter much to the forty five year old. It’s more about the process…it’s more about the road.

World of Speed Jr Dragster Specialty Awards Driver of the Year Alisha Miller

World of Speed Jr Dragster Specialty Awards Driver of the Year Alisha Miller

Fantastic stories and laughs were had all around at the 37th Annual Woodburn Dragstrip Awards Dinner at the Holiday Inn in Wilsonville. Specialty awards and championship trophies were handed out, with every person in attendance having a grand time.

In racing news, Nicholas Shepherd was honored with the Kershaw Knives Driver of the Year award, finishing fourth in the Sunoco Series Pro category as well as winning the Division 6 Race of Champions Pro Championship, representing the division in Pomona at the World Finals. RFC Chaplain’s Dave Cookman and Al Lyda were rewarded as Persons of the Year for their dedication and joy brought to everyone they meet.  Duane Merritt and Joe Adams were both awarded with the Pico Wiring Crew Member of the Year award, for their excellent work in tuning driver’s Julie Adams and Traci DePeel to a 1st and 5th place finish in the Super Pro category. Kacee Pitts earned the Most Improved Driver award for finishing with a Championship in the Wilson’s Napa High School as Powderpuff category, as well as a 4th place finish in her first year competing in the Sunoco Race Fuels ET Series Sportsman category.  Duane Stoner was crowned as Employee of the Year, Quality Concrete was awarded as Sponsor of the Year, Stephanie gross won the $1000 drawing from A-1 Performance Trans and Converters, Devon Hilton, Cliff Mansfield, and Kacee Pitts tied with the most Perfect Lights (5), sharing the award for $600 in product from NW Wholesale/Hilton Racing, the suppliers of Goodyear/Hoosier/Mickey Thompson Racing Tires.

Alisha Miller was congratulated to the highest degree in the Jr Dragster category, earning World of Speed Jr Dragster Driver of the Year honors, thanks to her 6 event wins (in 10 races), Jr Thunder Championship, and Division 6 Summit ET Finals Jr Thunder Championship. Chad Rice was the recipient of the Person of the Year Award, for his excellence in helping new drivers in the Race Cars for Kids program, as well as all other contestants. Ryan Bese concluded an excellent first year of competing in the Jr program with the Rookie of the Year honor, and Rilynn Saucy earned Most Improved Driver after going from 7th to 2nd in the Jr Storm category. Jr racers collectively voted World of Speed as Sponsor of the Year, and Kacee Pitts, Alisha Miller, and Ryan Bese earned overall #1 Qualifier awards.

We wish to thank everybody for the spectacular 2014 racing season, and hope that everyone enjoys their off season. There are only 104 days until racing season starts again!!!

2014 Season Champions

SUNOCO RACE FUELS ET SERIES
Super Pro: Julie Adams
Pro: Steve Stuart
Sportsman: Jerry Durant Jr
Motorcycle: Don DePeel
WILSON’S NAPA
High School: Kacee Pitts
 
WORLD OF SPEED JR DRAG RACING SERIES
Jr Lightning: Taylor Toftemark
Jr Thunder: Alisha Miller
Jr Storm: Ramon Vincent
 
SPORT COMPACT CHALLENGE
Sport Compact Pro: Bernd Arndt
Sport Compact Sportsman: Hoppy Hopkins
 
NOSTALGIA HOT ROD SERIES
Top Gas: Mike Miller
Hot Rod I: Rick Sales Sr
Street Machine I: Dave Bronec
Hot Rod II: Garry Heinrich
Street Machine II: Tony Bombara
Stick Shift: Dick Arnold
Inline/Flathead: CJ Stoakes
SPECIALTY SERIES
Dragster/Roadster: Steve Marcus
Super Shifter: John Masterman
Volkswagen: Devon Hilton
Pickup: Jerry Durant Jr
Olympic Iron Works Harley: John Plaster
Powderpuff: Kacee Pitts
Hole in the Hood: Jay Phillips
 
FALL ET & JR SERIES
Electronics: Bill/Tony McNeal
Transbrake: Dave Bronec
Foot Brake: Jerry Durant Jr
Jr Lightning: Kyler Pitts
Jr Thunder: Trevin Walberg
 
Specialty Awards
Kershaw Knives Driver of the Year: Nicholas Shepherd
Person of the Year: Dave Cookman & Al Lyda
Pico Wiring Crew Member of the Year: Duane Merritt & Joe Adams
Most Improved Driver: Kacee Pitts
Sponsor of the Year: Quality Concrete
Employee of the Year: Duane Stoner

A-1 Performance Trans and Converters Package for the Points Winner: Stephanie Gross

NW Wholesale/Hilton Racing Perfect Light Club Most .000’s Award: 5 Perfect Lights: Devon Hilton, Cliff Mansfield, Kacee Pitts
 
World of Speed Jr Dragster Specialty Awards
Driver of the Year: Alisha Miller
Person of the Year: Chad Rice
Rookie of the Year: Ryan Bese
Most Improved Driver: Rilynn Saucy
Sponsor of the Year: World of Speed
Most #1 Qualifiers, Lightning: Kacee Pitts
Most #1 Qualifiers, Thunder: Alisha Miller
Most #1 Qualifiers, Storm: Ryan Bese

5th Annual DOWNTOWN HISTORIC OREGON CITY CRUISE-IN

Downtown-2014-Cruise-051web

September 13th 2014, turned out to be perfect weather wise for the Downtown Cruise-in.  The good weather no doubt contributed to the better than ever turn out, more car than any year previously.  The quality of cars was really good too.  
Several clubs showed up in mass this year and represented the Ford Mustang very well.  A whole side street of Mustangs from 1964 ½ to nearly new were spit shined and gleaming in the sun.  There was a parking lot nearly full of Nomads.

Downtown-2014-Cruise-030web

There were Rat Rods, Street Rods, Customs, Street Machines, Cruisers, Old and new Race cars, Camaros, Corvettes, Rusty Relics, Completely Restored cars, cars under construction, Hot Rods and Late Model examples that will one day likely be collector cars themselves.

The Cruise came off almost without a hitch.  The Club, Trick ‘n Racy Cars, and the Downtown merchant association, Main Street Oregon City, had everything under control from start to finish.  The trophies/awards, were donated by local businesses and individuals, with some of them being handmade, which made them quite unique.  

The 6th Annual Cruise next year is scheduled for September 12th 2015.  Again it will be a one day cruise starting at 10:00am and ending at 4:00pm.  Put it on your calendar and come visit Historic Downtown Oregon City.

All for the love of STREET RODS & CUSTOM CARS

Steve-Kaiser-Story-2-001WEB

Steve Kaiser didn’t play much football, basketball or baseball back in the 1940s and 50s when he was growing up. Didn’t play a musical instrument in the school band or take a class in auto shop, as Jefferson High School didn’t offer a car building program back then. He did excel in the creative arts. Thanks to his understanding of how shapes, colors and artistic form create a true work of art, and we at R&R publication are proud to bring you Mr. Steve Kaiser’s four works’ of artistic automotive wonder.

Steve was happily married for over forty years. The proud father of two fantastic kids and three grandchildren. He lost his wife Vicki to illness a few years back. He  was a dedicated employee at Boeing Air-Craft for over twenty two years and at age seventy two is enjoying his retirement. Steve has also been very active in the Toys-for-Tots program here in the Portland area. Just a few weeks ago he made a super delivery of a whole truck load of bikes  and safety helmets for kids of all ages.

Steve would like to recognize and thank the following individuals who over the past thirty plus years have played a role in the designing and building of  his four custom built creations: Russ Meeks, Richard Pruitt, Lonnie Gilbertson, Mitch Kim, Jim Sanders, The Crew at Paolo Engine Service, Lenny Roeger and Steve’s #1 good buddy Larry Wilson who worked on every car.

Mr. Kaiser, we at Roddin’ & Racin’ want to thank you for sharing your fantastic world-class artistic creations with us and our thousands of readers in the northwest. “ALL for the Love of Hot Rods and Custom Cars.”