Found Treasure

When you hear the phrase “barn find” you think antique car, old muscle car or a vintage race car. Well, this is very similar, and it has to do with a vintage race car.

When I retired one of my projects was to clean and organize the attic. I have gotten to the point that I am going through old photos. In my search, I found a treasure: 6 original photos of the 1966 Le Mans winning Ford GT40 Mark II.

I had heard stories that car companies would go around the country displaying an award-winning race car. Apparently, it is true. In 1967 Ford displayed the GT40 Mark II at Wilson Ford in Corvallis, Oregon.

In 1980 I was working in the parts department of a dealership in Corvallis. One of the salesmen, knowing I like race cars, gave me some photos. The photos were originally taken with a Kodak Instamatic camera and the date, 1967, was hand written on the back. The photos show the car being delivered to Wilson’s Ford on an open flatbed trailer that was being towed by a ‘67 Ford Ranchero. The photos in the showroom show how small the GT40 is, and how low it is compared to a ‘67 Ford Galaxy and a ‘67 Ford Falcon. I had heard stories that car companies would go around the country displaying an award-winning race car. Apparently, it is true. In 1967 Ford displayed the GT40 Mark II at Wilson Ford in Corvallis, Oregon.

It’s funny that the flatbed trailer the GT40 Mark II was delivered in was so different from the modern transporters. Nowadays you see a Semi truck and trailer with room enough for up to 3 race cars. These transporters may have engine shop, machine shop, fabricating shop, or even a place to sit back and relax.

Back in ‘67 I would love to have seen this great race car, one of my favorites.

In 1966 the Ford Motor Co. entered 8 cars in the 24-hour race at Le Mans. Five other GT40s were entered by privateers. Ford swept the top three places with the GT40 Mark II serial number P/1046 came up the winner.

After a complete restoration, in 2014 it was reported that the Ford GT40 Mark II serial number P/1046 was sold for $22 million dollars. Since I can’t afford the real car the photos are the next best, found treasure.

Highschool Hero

The guys had been telling me about Monroe High School for quite a while. All girls. Our school, Benson Tech, was all boys. Obviously, Monroe High was a subject of great interest among many of my classmates. “The deal is,” my classmates said, “you cruise on by the front of the school, stop at the stop sign, then cut loose from there.”

It was the coolest thing you could do, so they said, to impress the chicks. The chicks really dug it when you did big, hairy burnouts in front of their school. It meant you had a fast car. It was a manly thing.

Now, my ’57 Ranchero was no slouch. I had swept a lot of floors to earn the bread to keep it on the road. Plus I was an auto shop major. That qualified me as an expert mechanic, capable of doing all the maintenance, hop up mods and all that.

She was real fine. Had a 4-speed with a 289. Oh sure she could litem up okay. Smoke the hydes for a good block—or two or even three, if anybody cared to know. 9 Grand hole shots would do it every time (we liked to use that hot rod jargon to impress the guys and the chicks – when there were any around).

Next morning found me headed off to school early. Mom must have been amazed at that. Even more so, that I had taken the time to wash the car. Aw, but I was on a mission.

Once I hit the street in front of Monroe High, I idled her down nice and slow. Exhaust rumbling nice and low, loping down the street in second gear. All the better so they would notice my big cam. Yes it was good to be behind the wheel of my trusty rod. I was enjoying the scenery – all those short skirts billowing in the morning breeze.

As I rolled up to the stop sign, I stab the throttle good and hard. Had to make sure I had the attention of everyone around. A little old lady lived in the small house on the corner across from the school. I guess she usually parked her little old Studebaker on the curb out front. I imagine it must have been kind of neat to have a front-row view of all the action every morning. I would have to impress her too.

I had a firm grip on the steering wheel as the incredible launch pushed me deep into my seat. I was already off the gas and on the brakes in the split instant I realized I had made a big mistake!

In my haste, I had forgotten about the worn threads and loose nut on my steering wheel shaft. Then there was the minor inconvenience of the brakes pulling hard to the right on emergency stops. Pretty hard for this loose nut to correct when the steering wheel is no longer hooked to the car. It had pulled right off in my hands.

It must have been quite a sight when I crashed into the back end of that little old ladies Studebaker. Front end of my trusty Ranchero rolled up like an accordion. What’s left of the little old Studebaker now sitting in her front yard.

Then me, piling out of my car and with a mighty heave, launching the detached steering wheel high into the air. I vaguely recall hearing some applause from the schoolyard.

I was late arriving to auto shop that morning. When my Ranchero arrived on a hook, I nonchalantly announced that I was bringing in a new project.

’nuff said. … way too much said.

—Chuck Fasst

Grand National Roadster Show

Recently I talked about “Bucket List” items. Probably many of us have such a list and the things we want to do of course varies. A lot of the things on my list include car events and activities, surprising I know. But, one of those events has been the Grand National Roadster Show, sponsored by O’Reilly Auto Parts, presented by Meguiar’s Premium Car Care Products, and as of late, held at the LA County Fair Complex in Pomona California. This show has been going on for a lot of years and this year was the 70th Annual.

The fact that this was the 70th is significant. Another significant thing about this show is the AMBR Award, Americas Most Beautiful Roadster. This “Class” is open to all United States built roadsters, roadster pickups and touring cars 1937 and older, including designer roadsters that resemble a 1937 or older roadster. This special class has awards for Display, Engineering, Undercarriage, Paint, Engine, Interior and detail. The winner has their name applied to the perpetual 9-foot-tall trophy, a $10,000 cash package and the title.

Among the names shown on the trophy, some with connections to the Northwest are, Blackie Gijeian, George Barris, Leroy “Tex” Smith, Bob Tindle, Lonnie Gilbertson, John Corno, Dennis Varni, Boyd Coddington, Darryl Hollenbeck, dating all the way back to the first “Grand Daddy of Them All” show in 1950. It has a distinguished history.

There were 6 buildings each with their own ‘theme,” filled with fantastic vehicles, living up to the “Grand Daddy” moniker. Outside in the open areas between and around the buildings, on Saturday and Sunday, there were cars displayed that were driven to the show by their owners, like a cruise-in. Many of these were included by their owner’s club affiliations. They numbered in the hundreds.

There were as many as 300 vendors displaying anything and everything you might need to help you build your “AMBR” for next years show.
My friend Jim Estes and I drove down to Pomona from Portland, Oregon in his new diesel-powered GMC pickup. Amazingly, it got a best MPG of 21.9 on one leg of the trip. I was surprised and glad since we shared the costs of the trip. After we got back though, I checked to see what the trip costs would have been if we had flown and rented a car. Of course, it would have saved us two travel days each way and it would have cost about the same. I think next time we’ll fly and rent. Another “bucket list” show happens to be at the same place over Father’s Day weekend in June each year, The LA Roadster Show. We’ll have to try to make that one, one of these days.

Spinning the Big Wheel

Parnelli Jones was considered one of the “Big Wheels” at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. He had arrived on the scene in 1961 and shared Rookie of the Year honors with Bobby Marshman after an inspired performance. In 1962 he broke the 150 mph barrier, qualifying J.C. Agajanian’s roadster in the pole position and forfeited a commanding lead after losing his brakes. In only his third start, Jones again captured the pole and went on to win the 500 stopping the foreign invasion (Team Lotus) dead in their tracks.

In what would turn out to be his final Memorial Day classic (1967), Jones was again the man to beat. His assigned steed was Andy Granatelli’s Turbo Car, the most technically advanced racecar to ever appear at Indianapolis. Legal to the letter but extremely controversial, Jones’ turbine powered, four wheel drive rocket ship was a dark horse. There had simply been no precedent. Turbines had always been eligible, but no one had ever qualified one. Adding to the mystique, Granatelli, Jones and everyone else involved with the race car, shrugged when asked about its capability. Their qualifying time was nothing spectacular but some found their ambivalence suspect…Perhaps they were saving what they knew until race day?

At the drop of the green flag, Jones laid his hand on the table. He chased the first two rows of qualifiers into turn one drifting high and powered around them. In the short chute he crisscrossed the track and devoured the leader Mario Andretti as they entered turn two. By the time he reached the start/finish line, Jones was already leading by a country mile and pulling away. At fifteen laps the Turbine was twelve seconds ahead of second place. Then at eighteen laps, it began to rain.

The 500 was postponed until the following day but when racing resumed, Jones’ domination continued.

Meanwhile after starting back in the twenty sixth position, a rookie from the NASCAR ranks was experiencing his first Indy car race. Lee Roy Yarbrough was well known down in Florida but here at the Brickyard, he was just another neophyte. He had a year old Vollstedt Ford to drive for seatbelt magnate Jim Robbins. It was a competitive car but Yarbrough spun in the opening laps and by now was just trying to keep pace with the field.

On the fifty second lap Jones swooped in on Yarbrough to put him yet another lap down. “My car runs so quiet, the other drivers can’t hear me coming,” Jones explained later. Nor could Yarbrough see him, evidently. Even if he could, he wouldn’t have been expecting the leader to dive underneath him (left wheels under the line) going into the turn. The racers touched wheels and began a graceful pirouette into the infield. The Turbine T-boned the Vollstedt briefly, then they slid together and separated. Amazingly, neither car was disabled, and both contestants were able to continue after a pit stop to change out their flat spotted tires.

Jones claimed that after the initial contact, the cars never touched again but photographs show damage to body panels on both racers after the incident. Was the damage merely cosmetic? We’ll never know.

The balance of Jones’ race is well documented. He continued to ride roughshod over the field until four laps from the finish when a six dollar bearing in the gearbox failed. Yarbrough soldiered on until he was involved in second incident, this time trying to avoid a spinning car. The crumpled Vollstedt was abandon in the infield with a total of eighty seven laps scored.

In Bill Libby’s biography “Parnelli” the incident was blamed entirely on Yarbrough but examination of the film tells a very different story. For his part, Jones never accepted any responsibility-then again, why would he? When you are a former 500 champion and a respected veteran, you think about your legacy. With everyone willing to point a finger at Yarbrough, it was prudent for Jones to keep his mouth shut.

HAULIN’ BUNS: A partly fabricated and almost entirely true story of the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile’s first lap around the Indianapolis Motor Speedway

“How fast does it go?” I asked. “ It hauls buns!” said the overly cheery 20-something-year old sitting next to me. With a wry smile and a huge crank of the comically large steering wheel, the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile gently eased itself onto the surface of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

For the sake of their identities, we shall call the two representatives from your favorite hotdog manufacturing company Jessica and Chris. Why the secrecy? Though the famed Wienermobile had graced the Racing Capitol of the World with it’s presence before, this time around was a little different.

On a crisp winter morning between snowfalls, the Wienermobile was going to take its first flying lap around the famed 2.5 mile oval. In years past the “frank” was quarantined to the parking lot, but today this dog was going to cook up some new history. Track security wouldn’t mind right? (Shhh… don’t tell anyone)

Though the banking in turn one is a slight 9 degrees, you could feel the weight shift to the left side. Chris at the wheel filled me in on the specifics.

“There are six Wienermobiles out there right now,” he explained. “Jessica and I are recent college grads. I was a Communications major and she wants to work in Human Resources. We are two of thousands of candidates from around the country that applied for the job.” Both from opposite sides of the U.S., the two were put together back in June.

“Oscar Mayer pairs us up,” piped up Jessica from the second row of seats as we entered turn 2. “Chris and I never met before then. We are a team for 6 months, assigned a region of the country- ours is the Midwest of course – then we get reassigned a new partner, a new dog and a new region. We do that for six more months then retire as Hotdoggers.”

Two kids in a giant hotdog traveling across the Midwest in all weather conditions for one year – what could go wrong? After their residency they could decide to stay in the Oscar Mayer/ Kraft Heinz family or move on to the next adventure.

The first adaptation of the Wienermobile was built in 1936 by Oscar Mayer’s nephew – Carl G. Mayer. The dog has evolved over the decades and you might have seen the 1952 version at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan. The “Hotdogger” program was invented and recent grads like Chris and Jessica were the perfect candidates.

In the early days of the Wienermobile, various actors were hired to play the character “Little Oscar” and hand out whistles and hotdogs. The most notable was George A. Molchan who toured as Little Oscar for 20 years, then dawned the costume for another 16 to greet fans at the Oscar Mayer restaurant in Walt Disney World. Like the rest of his troupe, George had a hard time finding viable work as a little person in the 1940s. The Little Oscar character was a rewarding role for decades before the Hotdogger program was put in place in 1988.
Jessica let out a high-pitched breath like a balloon with a small hole in it as the 27- foot long crossed the yard of bricks. “This is one of the coolest things we have done. Like, ever.” She said.

As we quickly snuck back into the Speedway’s parking lot, Jessica talked about their busy itinerary as ambassadors of the bun. “We go to sports venues – pretty much all ball parks. Makes sense right? We go to schools, museums, grocery store openings and children’s hospitals. Yeah it’s about promoting the product – but it’s more about making people smile.” The following day they planned to hit a local brewery and drive around Circle City.

With a handful of stickers, “Weiner Whistles” and postcards, Jessica and Chris left me outside of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum with a beaming smile and a childlike euphoria. None of my coworkers would understand my excitement of riding around my favorite place in my favorite enlarged novelty food vehicle. No one else had to. The Wienermobile had performed its magic and served its purpose – it brightened my day…. And it made me hungry.

NWDRA HI-PERFORMANCE AUTOMOTIVE SWAP MEET January 27, 2019

Does anyone stay home to watch the Pro Bowl? I mean, I enjoy pro football as much as the next guy but aren’t most of us ready for a break between the Playoffs and the Super Bowl? I think the answer is “yes” and that helps explain why the Northwest Drag Racing Association’s swap meet held the weekend prior to the Super Bowl, is always so well attended.

This year the club was celebrating their 43rd year- the inaugural having taken place way back in 1975. “The first (gathering) was held at Mount Hood Community College,” explained Event Spokespeople Andy Tabor and Lettie. “From there we moved to Canby Fairgrounds because we needed more room and from there we moved here because it was warmer!” (Heat is certainly a consideration when planning a mid-winter swap meet).

When asked what they were shopping for, two racers that had driven up from Roseburg responded that it was mostly a social event for them. “We don’t get too much time to shoot the breeze at the track,” they agreed. A massive fellow was pulling a wagon overstuffed with goodies like Santa’s sleigh. “My wife likes the flea market,” he stated. She had found a vintage game of Pick-Up-Stix and was over the moon. Sure enough, the offering at this gathering is diverse. Hardcore new and used engine components are plentiful as is gently used safety equipment ( I, myself purchased a used driving suit last year). But there is also a huge selection of non-racing items, hence the “flea market” reference.

When asked what else the organizers had planned for the coming year, they mentioned “The Classic”- a racing event they started at PIR then relocated to Woodburn. There are new events still being planned for the upcoming season so for more information call Lettie at (503) 644-5707.

Barrett-Jackson Auction

The Barrett-Jackson Collector Car Auction in Scottsdale is not just an auction of beautiful, rare, stunning, vintage, modern and new, beautifully restored, very unique and in many cases OMG amazing vehicle? NO, it is so much more! Once you’ve gone through the very professional security check points and walked through those entry doors, it’s like entering another world. A world of automotive and life style, sensory, bombardment. The huge Ford display is first with over a dozen of their newest vehicles on display. The commercial displays from automotive, to fine art, jewelry, vacation retreats, fine furniture, neon signs, etc., are set up all around that sprawling auction area behind those entry doors. The displays continue outside, where most of the 1800+ vehicles are on display in a half dozen gigantic tents. There are wonderful food vendors with a wide variety of culinary choices and yes even lobster is available.

Barrett-Jackson Collector Car Auctions are known for being NO RESERVE auctions but, in recent years they have accepted some specialty vehicles with a reserve price. At Scottsdale the sell-through rate was 99.74% totaling over $118 million, plus, over $9.6 million went to national, regional and local charities, through the sale of no commission vehicle sales. A brand new 2020 Toyota Supra with vin #20201 raised $2.1 million for the American Heart Association and the Bob Woodruff Foundation. Sanderson Ford in Glendale, AZ. donated a 2018 Ford Mustang Cobra Jet. It sold for $200,000.00 with 100% of the sales price going to Fighter Country Foundation at Luke Air Force Base. Fighter Country Foundation supports the men, women and their families stationed there. Top Gun pilot, Col. Richard Toliver (in the red coat standing behind the Mustang, as part of the Fighter Country Mustang sale. Col. Toliver was part of the famed Tuskegee Airman and flew 446 missions in F4 Phantom jets during the Vietnam war. The top charity vehicle sold, was a 2019 Ford GT Heritage Edition vin #001 that sold for $2.5 million benefiting United Way for Southern Michigan. Next up for Barrett-Jackson is their Palm Beach Florida Collector Car Auction April 11-13. For all the information just go to www.barrett-jackson.com

Variety is the Spice of Life

A mild winter here in Albany, but a highlight of the winter is the Winter Rod and Speed Show at the Linn County Fairgrounds. This year’s show was an exceptional show with a great selection of cars, trucks, racing vehicles there. Not only was there a unique variety of vehicles , but a unique variety of vendors as well. Vendors selling their wares, such as die-cast models, tee shirts, metal signs, and leaf gutter covers—more to come on that later.

Now on to the show! There was a mixture of vehicles such as a traditional classic beautiful blue T-Bucket and an Indy car, a 1986 March Indy car powered by a fuel injected small block Chevy engine, driven by sprint car champion Sammy Swindell. If you like sports car there was an original 1953 MG and a replica of a 1958 Ferrari 250 Testa Rosa. In the same building was a very unique truck. Some would call it a rat rod. I call it a work of art. It’s a ‘32 Dodge cab modified, on a semi truck chassis. The suspension is air operated with a combo compressor and air tank behind the cab. The rear axle has a set of duelies for tires and air bags to raise and lower the rear end. The front suspension is a straight front axle with custom fabricated cantilever rockers with air shocks. It came out of the Nasty Works Shop in Eugene. It is an engineering marvel.
Back to the vendors. If you were hungry there was popcorn, candy, beef jerky, ice cream, and nuts being sold by vendors. Also the best barbecue sauce I have ever tasted- the award winning “Best Damn bbq Sauce” out of Salem.

Back to the show. Every vehicle there was beautiful. A car that I had never seen before, a white ‘67 vw bug that was chopped, had an extended front suspension, no front fenders and very loud straight pipes coming from a heavily modified engine. This was along with your rail dragsters, drag alters, classic cars and trucks.

As you walk around the perimeter of the building, more vendors. Plastic models, paint and upholstery, different types of raffles, custom posters, custom drawings, key chains, scenty air fresheners, windows for your home and the new shop you are building were there for you to purchase. For the daring there was a nascar race car simulator where you can sit in a nascar race car and run a virtual race.

Speaking of works of art, Loren Kuipers from Scio brought his ‘65 Chevy pickup. It is pearl white and has blue trim with what looks like raindrops that he painted himself.

Also at the show was drag racer, artist, and author Kenny Youngblood. Local author Jim Lindsey, with 2 books about growing up in the time of early hot rodding.

So, next winter, usually around mid-January, if you want to add some spice to your life come to the Winter Rod and Speed Show in Albany.

2020 Corvette

GearHeads, by the time you read this we will all have one foot firmly planted into springtime. I for one, am surely looking forward to that. And the day is coming closer when we will all be able to see that awesome, new, mid-engined Corvette.

This month I would like to share with you some comments and factoids that came from a recent conversation between Autoline and Brett Smith, center for automotive research. We don’t know how much more life VW diesels have left in them after the recent VW gate, so to speak. VW is still a powerhouse garnering the most sales out in the world. It appears their counter move is going to involve investing heavily in battery factories. One question is, where in the world will these factories be built?

It looks like the current lithium ion batteries that are in the twelve EV models currently available in the world are not going to cut it. He says a battery breakthrough will be needed. He mention that there are many dozens and dozens of new models coming out. The market will become saturated in the US.

You have to factor in things like cost per kilowatt-hour to evaluate the industry. Hybrids are actually more versatile but they are more expensive to build. Not conducive to American corporations that are thoroughly addicted to the almighty dollar.

He expressed some concerns about the reliability of the EVs. Think about how well your cell phone works. And what happens when the grid goes down?

’nuff said,
Chuck Fasst GearHeadsWorld.blogspot.com

The Driver

15 years had passed. The Driver had missed the draft. He had spent almost two decades behind concrete and iron bars watching sun rise and set. Was he guilty? Well, he did drive. He was the pilot man. Yet, he never fired a shot or took a life. That was all upon the passenger and well, the passenger had a way with fire arms and a taste for blood.

Driver was apprehended. Driver had succumbed to the advances of the police and surrendered. Driver admitted guilt and gave up a life of fatherhood. He often dreamt of tiny embraces and a bright future, but behind cold concrete and hidden steel, life passes. Lives were lost. Memories fade as the days go on.

Hardened life stares on as dark brown hair turns to grey.  He sat on that Sunday in the barber station and wondered. In his clip was a scroll of contacts for the outside world. A road of grey and black. Opportunities and treachery.

Years of good behaviour led to the day of his parole.  3 times he had been turned down.

He counted the steps and watched his feet take a trail of uncertainty. Many times he had done as such only to be told to turn back and go back to the horde.

But not today. It was fast, really. Right’s read. A pardon. Freedom granted.
Opportunity.

And, as many times before, he sat on that bench and waited. Except this time, the hard, cold slam of the steel barred door did not occur.  Today a dance of the key spun in the locks and the cold iron door swung in his favour.

Free. He watched as the door let the daylight tumble upon the cold hard floor.

Outside the gates waiting was his dark green Galaxie ’64.

Driver stepped forward and a guard placed a hand his shoulder. “So, will I see you again?”

A warm wind lifted dust and the smell of fresh cut grass whipped past. Driver smiled.

“Not on your life.”

The convict walked across the yard and fell behind the wheel. He hit the key and the big old Ford responded and lurched forward.

As bad as the car and the man could have been, well, they never were again.

Even the hardest cowboys know when to let life take the reins, let fate control the journey and live life simple and good.